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Career Coach: Here’s how to ace the job interview

Posted on December 6, 2016 under Sales 101.

Whether you are interviewing for the first time or fifth time, here’s things to remember.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-business/wp/2016/12/02/career-coach-heres-how-to-ace-the-job-interview/

Remember, being considerate is good for your mental and physical health, your career, and everyone around you. Be KIND

Image result for words with pictures about kindness

Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

314-753-2802
1170 Tropical Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143

 


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What Do You Know Abour ‘Forest Bathing’?

Posted on November 29, 2016 under Life 101, Retirement Reimagined.

FOREST BATHING Is The Latest Fitness Trend To Hit the US

Where yoga was 30 years ago???

By Meeri Kim

May 17

(iStockphoto)

Over thousands of years of human history, we have effectively become an indoor species. Particularly for those of us trapped in the cubicle life, often the only times we regularly step foot outside is for our daily work commute or to run errands. In 2001, a survey sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency found that, on average, Americans spend 87 percent of their time indoors and 6 percent in an enclosed vehicle.

However, a number of scientific studies emphasize that reveling in the great outdoors promotes human health. Spending time in natural environments has been linked to lower stress levels, improved working memory and feeling more alive, among other positive attributes.

In an effort to combat our indoor epidemic and reap these health benefits, a growing number of Americans have become followers of a Japanese practice called Shinrin-yoku. Coined by the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries in 1982, the word literally translates to “taking in the forest atmosphere” or “forest bathing” and refers to the process of soaking up the sights, smells and sounds of a natural setting to promote physiological and psychological health.

The increasing popularity of Shinrin-yoku, particularly in California, echoes the adoption of other east-to-west health trends, such as yoga and meditation. And like these activities, forest therapy can be a guided, paid-for experience or freely performed solo.

“I think about where yoga was 30 years ago and where it is today, and I realize that forest therapy is making the same journey toward cultural definition in a way that will mainstream the practice,” said Ben Page, a certified forest therapy guide who founded Shinrin Yoku Los Angeles. He recently returned to his home in Southern California after training a cohort of forest therapy guides toward certification in Sonoma County — a week-long program popular enough to have a waiting list.

Those that practice Shinrin-yoku explain that it differs from hiking or informative nature excursions because it centers on the therapeutic aspects of forest bathing.

“So whereas a nature walk’s objective is to provide informational content and a hike’s is to reach a destination, a Shinrin-yoku walk’s objective is to give participants an opportunity to slow down, appreciate things that can only be seen or heard when one is moving slowly, and take a break from the stress of their daily lives,” Page said.

For instance, a 2010 study using data from field experiments conducted in 24 forests across Japan found that subjects who participated in forest bathing had lower blood pressure, heart rate and concentrations of salivary cortisol — a stress hormone — when compared with those who walked through a city setting. Studies performed in other countries, such as Finland and the United States showed similar reductions in tension and anxiety.

“There have been studies comparing walking in nature with walking in an urban environment and testing people on their mood, different aspects of depression, and in some cases, brain scans,” said David Yaden, a research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania’s Positive Psychology Center. “In the natural setting, people are more relaxed and less stressed.”

People on nature walks also tend to engage in less rumination, or negative self-referential overthinking, which has been correlated with depression.

Other studies have found an association between Shinrin-yoku and a boost in immune function. Subjects took a 3-day/2-night trip to forest areas in Japan with researchers taking blood and urine samples before and after the excursion. The numbers of natural killer cells — a type of white blood cell that fights infected or tumor cells — and other immune system markers were significantly higher after forest bathing than before. Participants’ natural killer cell activity rose about 50 percent throughout the trip, while their urinary adrenaline concentration showed a decrease.

“In Japan, Shinrin-yoku trails are certified by a blood-sampling study to determine whether the natural killer cell count is raised enough for the trail to qualify,” Page said. “I should also note that in Japan and Korea, forest therapy modalities are integrated into their medical system and are covered by insurance.”

Some researchers attribute Shinrin-yoku’s health benefits to substances called phytoncides, which are antimicrobial organic compounds given off by plants. They argue that by breathing in the volatile substances released by the forest, people achieve relaxation. However, phytoncides — colloquially known in forest bathing circles as “the aroma of the forest” — only exist in small concentrations out in the field as compared with the amounts given to subjects in laboratory-based olfactory studies.

Another possible explanation for forest bathing’s soothing effects involves our sense of awe when viewing natural beauty. Yaden, who recently published a study on the awe experienced by astronauts viewing Earth from space, explains that both perceptual (e.g. admiring a tall grove of trees or the Grand Canyon) and conceptual vastness (e.g. trying to wrap your mind around the Big Bang) can inspire awe in humans.

“We describe in the paper that this particular view of Earth produces both types of vastness — perceptual vastness of this sweeping view of the planet, but conceptual vastness of everything that the planet means to us as human beings,” Yaden said. Taking in the sights, sounds and smells of a forest could potentially arouse similar feelings of awe that have been linked to improvements in certain markers of good health.

While the exact mechanisms of Shinrin-yoku remain largely unknown, the practice itself continues to spread — perhaps as a backlash against modern society’s obsession with indoor-use technology and office culture. Amos Clifford, a wilderness guide based in the San Francisco Bay Area, founded the Association of Nature and Forest Therapy in 2012. For a tuition fee, the organization offers forest therapy guide certification programs. Besides U.S.-based training in Northern California and Massachusetts, others are scheduled for next year in Canada, Ireland, New Zealand and South Africa.

Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

314-753-2802
1170 Tropical Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143

 


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You Will Never Regret Being Kind

Posted on November 28, 2016 under Life 101.

2016-11-03-1478213220-62217-8HabitsofConsideratePeopleHP.jpg

**Philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer once said, “Politeness is to human nature what warmth is to wax.” It’s true. Being kind and considerate softens people and makes them malleable to your way of thinking.

But I see another meaning there, too. I think he’s also saying that being considerate of others is an integral part of what it means to be human. Charles Darwin would have agreed. He argued that our instinct to be considerate is even stronger than our instinct to be self-serving.

As obvious as that may seem, it’s only recently that neuroscience has been able to explain why. Research conducted by Dacher Keltner at Berkeley showed that our brains react exactly the same when we see other people in pain as when we experience pain ourselves. Watching someone else experience pain also activates the structure deep inside the brain that’s responsible for nurturing behavior, called the periaqueductal gray.

Being considerate of others is certainly a good career move, but it’s also good for your health. When you show consideration for others, the brain’s reward center is triggered, which elevates the feel-good chemicals dopamine, oxytocin, and endogenous opioids. This gives you a great feeling, which is similar to what’s known as “runner’s high,” and all that oxytocin is good for your heart.

“Being considerate of others will take you further in life than any college or professional degree.” – Marian Wright Edelman

That’s all well and good, but how practical is it? How do you become more considerate when you have so many other things competing for your finite mental energy? It’s not that hard—all you have to do is emulate the habits of highly considerate people.

1. Show up on time. Sure, sometimes things happen, but always showing up late sends a very clear message that you think your time is more important than everyone else’s, and that’s just rude. Even if you really do think that your time is more important, you don’t have to broadcast that belief to the world. Instead, be considerate and show up when you said you would.

2. Be deliberately empathic. It’s one thing to feel empathy for other people, but putting that feeling into action is another matter entirely. It’s great to be able to put yourself in someone else’s shoes—in fact, it’s essential—but that doesn’t necessarily translate into being considerate. To be deliberately empathic, you have to let your ability to walk in their shoes change what you do, whether that’s changing your behavior to accommodate their feelings or providing tangible help in a tough situation. This requires emotional intelligence.

3. Apologize when you need to (and don’t when you don’t).
We all know people who are so insecure or so afraid of offending someone that they practically apologize for breathing. In such situations, apologizing loses its meaning. But it’s a different matter entirely when a sincere apology is really necessary. When you’ve made a mistake, or even think you’ve made a mistake, apologizing is a crucial part of being considerate.

4. Smile a lot. Physically, it’s easier to frown than to smile—smiling involves 42 different muscles; however, it pays to make the extra effort, as smiling has a huge effect on other people. People naturally (and unconsciously) mirror the body language of the person they’re talking to. When you smile at people, they will unconsciously return the favor and feel good as a result.

5. Mind your manners. A lot of people have come to believe that not only are manners unnecessary, they’re undesirable because they’re fake. These people think that being polite means you’re acting in a way that doesn’t reflect how you actually feel, but they’ve got it backwards. “Minding your manners” is all about focusing on how the other person feels, not on how you feel. It’s consciously acting in a way that puts other people at ease and makes them feel comfortable.

6. Be emotionally intelligent. One of the huge fallacies our culture has embraced is that feeling something is the same as acting on that feeling, and that’s just wrong, because there’s this little thing called self-control. Whether it’s helping out a co-worker when you’re in a crunch to meet your own deadline or continuing to be pleasant with someone who is failing to return the favor, being considerate often means not acting on what you feel.

7. Try to find a way for everybody to win. Many people approach life as a zero-sum game. They think that somebody has to win and somebody else has to lose. Considerate people, on the other hand, try to find a way for everybody to win. That’s not always possible, but it’s their goal. If you want to be more considerate, stop thinking of every interaction with others as a win/lose scenario.

8. Act on your intuition when it comes to other people’s needs.
Sometimes you can just tell when someone is upset or having a bad day. In such cases, being considerate means checking in with them to see if your intuition is correct. If your intuition is telling you to reach out—do it; they’ll appreciate your concern.

Bringing It All Together

Being considerate is good for your mental and physical health, your career, and everyone around you. On top of that, it just feels good.

Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

314-753-2802
1170 Tropical Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
**from the blog of Dr. Travis Bradbury

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Thoughts For the Week(end)

Posted on May 26, 2016 under Thoughts for the Week.

Motivational, Inspirational, Failure, Success, Personal Growth, Success QuotesLife, Inspirational, Motivational, Encouraging Quotes
Inspirational, Motivational QuotesLife, Motivational Quotes

Love, Life, Motivational QuotesInspirational, Motivational Quotes
Letting go, Motivational, Inspirational Quotes

And finally, a couple of questions for you to consider as we head into the long weekend.

Thought Questions

Thought Questions

Thought Questions

Thought Questions

Make it a great rest of the week  always remember to  be memorable.
 
Remember though, the only person that can make you feel happy is you.  Don’t give others the power to bring you down!

Craig McConnell, President, PrintGrowPro/SalesGrowPro

www.printgrowpro.com

“Great selling is a process artfully done.”

Follow me on Twitter – http://twitter.com/printgrowpro

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Sales 101: Do You Even Know How To Have A Conversation? (a TEDTalk)

Posted on May 11, 2016 under Attitude Adjusters.

Image result for words with pictures on the importance of communicationImage result for words with pictures on the importance of communicationImage result for words with pictures on the importance of communication

 

When your job hinges on how well you talk to people, you learn a lot about how to have conversations — and that most of us don’t converse very well. Celeste Headlee has worked as a radio host for decades, and she knows the ingredients of a great conversation: Honesty, brevity, clarity and a healthy amount of listening. In this insightful talk, she shares 10 useful rules for having better conversations. “Go out, talk to people, listen to people,” she says. “And, most importantly, be prepared to be amazed.”

 

http://www.ted.com/talks/celeste_headlee_10_ways_to_have_a_better_conversation

 

Why you should listen

Celeste Headlee hosts a daily news/talk show, On Second Thought, on Georgia Public Broadcasting.

Headlee has worked in public radio since 1999, as a reporter, host and correspondent. She was the Midwest Correspondent for NPR before becoming the co-host of the PRI show “The Takeaway.” After that, she guest hosted a number of NPR shows including “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “Weekend All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition”. Headlee also anchored election coverage for PBS World in 2012 and was a regular guest on CNN.

Headlee holds multiple degrees in music and still performs as a professional opera singer. She appears on the album “Classically Blue” from gospel artist Lea Gilmore. She’s the granddaughter of composer William Grant Still.

 

Enjoy………………….

Craig J. McConnell

“Retirement Reimagined”
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to enter) Adulthood II
 

 


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Sales 101: A Clear Rejection Is Always Better Than A Fake Promise

Posted on May 9, 2016 under Sales 101.

Thought For The Day

For 30 days, say hello to everyone you see  -  and I mean everyone. Don’t walk by anyone without acknowledging them. Smile!  Make Eye Contact!  Say ‘Good Morning’. or ‘Good afternoon’ or just ‘HI”.  This is a simple but effective  self talk exercise that generates  positive energy and builds confidence for you, and will do the same for the recipient of your initiative.

David Sandler may have actually coined the expression ‘go for the no’ (or at least his intellectual property seems to imply that), but regardless, it is GREAT advice. I think his quote was something like “you don’t learn how to sell by getting a ‘yes’; you learn how to sell when you get a ‘no’.

Remember, “I’ll think about it” and ‘maybe’ do you no good at all.  Falling into the ‘think it over’ trap is only a time waster.  Timing is important, empathy is critical, but over time you will learn when it is time to give your prospects permission to say ‘no’.

LEARNING FROM REJECTION

When someone doesn’t say yes, they’ll often give you a reason.

A common trap: Believe the reason.

If you start rebuilding your product, your pitch and your PR based on the stated reason, you’re driving by looking in the rear view mirror.

The people who turn you down have a reason, but they’re almost certainly not telling you why.

Fake reasons: I don’t like the color, it’s too expensive, you don’t have enough references, there was a typo in your resume.

Real reasons: My boss won’t let me, I don’t trust you, I’m afraid of change.

By all means, make your stuff better. More important, focus on the unstated reasons that drive most rejections.

And most important: Shun the non-believers and sell to people who want to go on a journey with you.

 

 

Craig J. McConnell

“Retirement Reimagined”
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to enter) Adulthood II
 

 


314-753-2802
1170 Tropical Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458

 


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Sales 101: Green Eggs and Ham ‘aka’ The Value Of Persistence

Posted on April 25, 2016 under Sales 101.

 

Here’s A Thought For The Day

Failure is the path of least persistence.

All great sales people are professionally pleasantly positively persistent (4Ps).  How about you?  Give up easily?  Did you ever stop to count how many times ‘Sam I Am’ asks for the order (before he gets it)?   That is a real study in persistence – especially when you are selling green eggs and ham. 

 

From Seth Godin:

The tidal wave is overrated

Yes, it can lead to wholesale destruction, but it’s the incessant (but much smaller) daily tidal force that moves all boats, worldwide.

And far more powerful than either is the incredible impact of seepage, of moisture, of the liquid that makes things grow.

Facebook and other legendary companies didn’t get that way all at once, and neither will you.

We can definitely spend time worrying about/building the tsunami, but it’s the drip, drip, drip that will change everything in the long run.

A final thought:

If you are persistent you will get it = if you are consistent you will keep it.

Craig J. McConnell

“Retirement Reimagined”
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to enter) Adulthood II
 

 


314-753-2802
1170 Tropical Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 

 


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Sales 101: The Art of The Apology

Posted on April 14, 2016 under Sales 101.

Here Are The 6 Steps To The Perfect Apology, According To Science*

*WordPress and I are struggling tonight; this is a little tough to read and I apologize; worth the effort – promise!

April 13, 2016 | by Robin Andrews
A team of researchers has decided to delve into the human psyche in order to solve an age-old, mystifying problem: what’s the best way to make an apology?
According to their study, published in the journal Negotiation and Conflict Management Research, the perfect apology contains six elements, but acknowledging and accepting responsibility for at least part of the perceived wrongdoing is by far the most important.
The second most important factor was an offer of reparations. “One concern about apologies is that talk is cheap,” Roy Lewicki from The Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business, and lead author of the study, said in a statement.
“But by saying, ‘I’ll fix what is wrong,’ you’re committing to take action to undo the damage.”
Lewicki and his team recruited 333 adults from a range of backgrounds, each of whom was asked to read through a scenario in which they were the manager of an accounting department that was looking to hire a new employee.
At the previous job for one particular hypothetical candidate, they filed an incorrect tax return, but apologized when they were confronted with it.
Each apology varied, and contained one, three, or all six components of what the researchers thought commonly exist in apologies: 1. Expression of regret 2. Explanation of what went wrong 3. Acknowledgment of responsibility 4. Declaration of repentance 5. Offer of repair 6. Request for forgiveness
After being informed which components each apology contained, the participants were then asked to rate, on a numerical scale, how effective, credible, and suitable each apology was.
This study revealed that, in general, the more components that were included, the more effective the apology was.
In a second study, the researchers asked 422 undergraduate students to read through the same scenario included in the first. This time, however, instead of being told which components each apology contained, they were left in the dark. In addition, each apology could contain anywhere from one to six of the components.
Once again, the apologies with the most components were seen to be more effective. Significantly, however, both studies agreed that asking for forgiveness was seen as the least important aspect, whereas accepting responsibility was seen as the most important.
Intriguingly, in both studies, half of the participants were told the tax return error was made accidentally, whereas the other half were told it was knowingly filed incorrectly. Regardless of which they were told, the value of each apologetic component remained the same.
Ultimately, though, the participant who had acted deceivingly was less likely to be hired than the one that was merely incompetent.
It’s important to note that this study only involved reading apologetic statements, so the body language and emotion inherent in verbal apologies – which is at least as important as the content of the apology itself – was unable to be taken into account.
For this, we’re sure the authors can only apologize.
Have a great rest of the week and make sure you stay MEMORABLE!!!
Craig J. McConnell
“Retirement Reimagined”
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to enter) Adulthood II
 
314-753-2802
1170 Tropical Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458
53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 

Comments (0)
Sales 101: What Skills Did You Learn In College?

Posted on April 3, 2016 under Sales 101, Thoughts for the Week.

 Image result for words with pictures about educationImage result for words with pictures about educationImage result for words with pictures about education

“There are now millions of college seniors going about their job search in earnest.

And many of them are using the skills they’ve been rewarded for in the past:

Writing applications

Being judged on visible metrics

Showing up at the official (placement) office

Doing well on the assignments

Paying attention to deadlines, but waiting until the last minute, why not

Getting picked

Fitting in

The thing is, whether you’re a newly graduating senior (in hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt) or a middle-aged, experienced knowledge worker looking for a new job, what the best gigs want to know is:

Can you show me a history of generous, talented, extraordinary side projects?

Have you ever been so passionate about your work that you’ve gone in through the side door?

Are you an expert at something that actually generates value?

Have you connected with leaders in the field in moments when you weren’t actually looking for a job?

Does your reputation speak for itself?

Where online can I see the trail of magic you regularly create?

None of these things are particularly difficult to learn, if you are willing to be not very good at them before you’re good at them.

Alas, famous colleges and the industrial-education process rarely bother to encourage this.

Image result for words with pictures about educationImage result for words with pictures about educationImage result for words with pictures about education

 

Craig J. McConnell

“Retirement Reimagined”
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to enter) Adulthood II
 

 


314-753-2802
1170 Tropical Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 

 


Comments (0)
Thoughts For The Week & Sales 101: What Are You Competing On?

Posted on March 22, 2016 under Sales 101.

Image result for words with pictures about being memorableImage result for words with pictures about being memorableImage result for words with pictures about being memorableImage result for words with pictures about being memorableImage result for words with pictures about being memorableImage result for words with pictures about being memorable

What are you competing on?

 

It’s pretty easy to figure out what you’re competing for—attention, a new gig, a promotion, a sale…

But what is your edge? In a hypercompetitive world, whatever you’re competing on is going to become your focus.

If you’re competing on price, you’ll spend most of your time counting pennies.

If you’re competing on noise, you’ll spend most of your time yelling, posting, updating, publishing and announcing.

If you’re competing on trust, you’ll spend most of your time keeping the promises that make you trustworthy.

If you’re competing on smarts, you’ll spend most of your time getting smarter.

If you’re competing on who you know, you’ll spend most of the time networking.

If you’re competing by having true fans, you’ll spend most of your time earning the trust and attention of those that care about your work.

If you’re competing on credentials, you’ll spend most of your time getting more accredited and certified.

If you’re competing on perfect, you’ll need to spend your time on picking nits.

If you’re competing by hustling, you’ll spend most of your time looking for shortcuts and cutting corners.

If you’re competing on getting picked, you’ll spend most of your day auditioning.

If you’re competing on being innovative, you’ll spend your time being curious and shipping things that might not work.

And if you’re competing on always-on responsiveness, you’ll spend your time glued to your work, responding just a second faster than the other guy.

In any competitive market, be prepared to invest your heart and soul and focus on the thing you compete on. Might as well choose something you can live with, a practice that allows you to thrive.

 Make it a memorable week! Be Kind!

Craig J. McConnell


(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

Visit me @ www.printgrowpro.com


314-753-2802
1170 Tropical Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 


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