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Thoughts For The Week & A “SMILE” Reminder

Posted on November 30, 2015 under Attitude Adjusters.

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A genuine smile from within shows on the outside:  you smile with your eyes and mouth, and it’s called the Duchenne smile. Not to say you have to walk around with a grin all the time! But when you smile on the inside, people are more receptive when you approach them.  Psychologists at the University of California at Berkley studied 141 high school senior-class photos from the 1960 yearbook of Mills College, and followed up with the same people at age 27, 43 and 52. The women with a Duchenne smile were more likely to be married and stay married than those who had a fake smile, and were more likely to experience greater sense of personal well-being. These results were found to be consistent in a 30-year follow up. Also, appearance had no correlation with life satisfaction; it all came from within. When you smile from the heart and follow up with a kind personality, you will get more and give more to the world than you ever thought possible.

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Craig J McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
 

 

(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable
(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement

314-753-2802

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TFTW and Some Observations on EMPATHY & WORK

Posted on November 23, 2015 under Thoughts for the Week.

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Empathy is defined by Wikipedia as: “the capacity to recognize or understand another’s state of mind or emotion. It is often characterized as the ability to “put oneself into another’s shoes” or in some way experience the outlook or emotions of another being within oneself.  Empathy does not necessarily imply compassion, or empathic concern because this capacity can be present in context of compassionate or cruel behavior.”

Empathy Drives Sales

Brian Tracy says that if you’re “telling, you’re not selling.’  Great sales people ask great questions and are able to really find out what is really important to their prospects and clients.  The great thing about an emotional competency like empathy is that it can be developed and enhanced.  It just takes practice and has to become a habit.

The really great sales men and women listen, understand what the customer wants, and either give it to her or send her somewhere else where they think they can get it.  That’s empathy; understanding the customer’s needs.  It’s not rocket science, but not everyone can ‘put themselves in the other guys shoes’ every day.

 

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Image result for quotes with pictures about sales

Image result for quotes with pictures about sales

Image result for quotes with pictures about sales

 

OBSERVATIONS FROM JILLIEN GORDON ON WORK vs. WORKAHOLISM

Over the past year, I’ve been reading, researching, and conducting experiments on myself to understand the difference between high performers and workaholics. I believe that there are healthier ways for us to work without sacrificing our values, the people we value, or the value we create but we, as a society, we mistake workaholism for high performance, but they are two distinct ways of working. In fact, workaholism is the only addiction we celebrate.

High performance and workaholism look the same on the outside. They both look like hard work. The BIG DIFFERENCE is how the individual feels on the inside about who they are in relationships to their work.

A high performer works hard in healthy sustainable ways and feels happy and inspired.

A workaholic works hard in unhealthy unsustainable ways and feels unhappy and burned out.

1. Doing Business vs. Being Busy

A high performer’s #1 goal is to do business. The only thing that matters to them are results. If they can’t see a way to create value in the moment, they facilitate or strategize instead. They know that like the economy, business comes in waves, therefore, they get ready during the dips so they can capitalize during the upswings.

A workaholic’s #1 goal is to be busy. Workaholics fill any space in time with busy work because they feel insecure doing nothing. The insecurity comes from not knowing their value. They believe that the busier they are, the more important they must be. As a result, they find a way to be busy even when it’s not busy season instead of periodically hibernating throughout the days, weeks, months, quarters, and year for when the highs come.

2. Knows What’s Enough vs. Never Enough

A high performer knows what is enough. Whether we win by 1 point or 50 points, it doesn’t matter. A win is a win. High performers seek more in the areas that matters, but they know what enough is in the areas that don’t matter so much. This comes from having a clear definition of success.

A workaholic doesn’t know what enough is. I’m not good enough. This isn’t good enough. I don’t have enough time. I don’t have enough support. They are always focused on more and seeking to maximize everything because they don’t really know what success means to them.

3. 100% At The Right Time vs. 110% All Of The Time

A high performer knows when to turn it up. When their number is called, they give everything they have. They don’t buy into the illusion of 110%. They know that 110% is unsustainable. Instead, they focus on increasing their capacity so that their 100% is better than the competition’s 110%.

A workaholic thinks “turn down for what?” They hustle, grind, and go H.A.M. all of the time. They have difficulty prioritizing what’s important, therefore, everything is important in their mind.

4. Knows Their Value vs. Allows Others To Determine Value

A high performer knows their self-worth and can thus work with a sense a freedom. This comes from doing periodic self-evaluation of their performance so that they can constantly improve. They create their own feedback loops rather than waiting on feedback from others.

A workaholic relies on external validation from their boss, colleagues, and clients and thus works with a sense of fear. They wait for external evaluations such as mid-year or annual reviews done by others to understand how well they are doing.

5. Proactive/Intentional vs. Reactive/Unintentional

A high performer is proactive about their time and work. They design their day and anchor the most meaningful and important things in time first, and then they allow fires and other unplanned events to fill in the rest of their day. They don’t allow distractions to deter their strategy.

A workaholic is reactive about their time and work. They allow other people to choose how their time gets spent working by reacting to emails, fires, unplanned events, and other distractions that arise throughout the day. If and when all of the minutia get addressed, they try to do what’s most meaningful.

6. Focus On What I Control vs. What I Can’t

A high performer focuses on their effort—inputs and outputs. Only the individual knows if they gave the task at hand their best. They judge themselves against their best self as opposed to others.

A workaholic focuses on the outcome and their income. Even when we think we do our best, the outcome that occurs and the income that is derived from it is not fully in our control. Their desire to compare leads them to judge themselves using common metrics of success which aren’t always directly correlated to effort.

7. Put Self First vs. Second

A high performer puts themselves first because they know that by doing so, it allows them to serve others at a higher level. At times it appears to be selfish, but it’s actually selfless because they want to give first-class service to those they work with and for.

A workaholic puts others before themselves. This appears to be selfless, but it’s not sustainable. When we constantly give more than we have and never take time to replenish our source, we end up depleted. This behavior is also driven by the good intention of service, but the desire to be needed and be the hero counters that intention.

At the end of the day, workaholics do work to look important while high performers look for important work to do.

 

Craig J McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
 

 

(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable
(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement

314-753-2802

 


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Thought For The Week: AWESOME (TedTalk Video)

Posted on November 16, 2015 under Sales 101, Thoughts for the Week.

 

Neil Pasricha’s blog 1000 Awesome Things savors life’s simple pleasures, from free refills to clean sheets. In this heartfelt talk, he reveals the 3 secrets (all starting with A) to leading a life that’s truly awesome. (Filmed at TEDxToronto.)

Check out this amazing TED Talk:

Neil Pasricha: The 3 A’s of awesome

 

Craig J. McConnell
President
PrintGrowPro/SalesGrowPro, Inc.
314-753-2802
craigmcconnell49@gmail.com
“Making Sales People Memorable”
 
Visit my blog @ www.printgrowpro.com
 
 
Follow me onTwitter:  http://twitter.com/printgrowpro
 
Grow sales via better prospect management:  www.veritastraining.com

 


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Thoughts For The Week – SEE IT; BELIEVE IT; ACT ON IT (a TEDTALK video)

Posted on November 10, 2015 under Thoughts for the Week.
Draw Your Future – Patti Dobrowolski TED

Craig J McConnell

“Retirement Reimagined”        “Entering Adulthood II”
 
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable
(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement

 

 

  
 

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Go Figure? Praising Employees Is A Good Thing To Do?

Posted on November 8, 2015 under Sales Management 101.

Latest Research Says Praising Employees Boosts Productivity After All

The concept behind this piece by Stephen Anderson of Forbes was so counter intuitive to me that I couldn’t help wanting to share it.

 ”Remember when praising was considered a good thing? No more. It’s become almost fashionable these days to think that praise is bad.

It’s bad for toddlers. It’s bad for older children. Maybe even children of any age. And is it bad for employees? If you listen to some experts, it’s almost certainly terrible for them. In fact, employees should beware of bosses who praise them.

But a new study from Harvard Business School suggests that — at least in regard to employees — we have it all wrong.

Telling your employees that they are doing a good job will lead to less stress, higher creativity and better problem solving.
Telling your employees that they are doing a good job might lead to them having less stress, higher creativity and better problem solving skills.

Perhaps the anti-praise movement arose as a backlash to excessive concern for developing “self-esteem” in children. Many feel that the result of instilling lots of self-esteem is not entirely healthy, especially when it is not supported by actual accomplishments. There is a long tradition of thought holding that self-esteem ought to be balanced, if not governed, by humility.

The promptings to humility that derive from the Protestant work ethic are deeply ingrained in the American psyche. The Book of Proverbs says, “Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall.” And folk wisdom encourages us not to make much of our deeds so that we don’t succumb to the vice of excessive pride. Think of all the famous literary characters who were undone, or nearly undone, by hubris — Oedipus, Macbeth and Mr. Darcy come quickly to mind, to name just a few.”

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Craig J McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
 
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable
(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement

314-753-2802

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TFTW & Sales 101: Be Brief! Be Brilliant! Be Gone!

Posted on November 2, 2015 under Thoughts for the Week.

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Craig J McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
 
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable
(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement

314-753-2802

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