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Life 101: “Reading Is Access To A Better Way Of Life!”

Posted on July 11, 2018 under Life 101.

 

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A few weeks ago I shared some observations about the potential value some ‘throw-back’ training:  BOOK REPORTS.

Peer-to-Peer learning is a great way to make sure you don’t allow your sales team to decline into mediocrity.  Mediocrity avoidance mandates that you deploy and implement new management tools that motivate, excite, and challenge your sales team – ‘rookies’ and ‘veterans’ alike.  Adding reading a book and giving a book report to your team’s next ‘to do’ list will do just that.

But on a more day to day, perhaps more practical perspective, does it not amaze you how many people DO NOT READ – period?

When folks tell me they don’t read, I automatically jump to my next question:  “Well, what do you  listen (think AUDIBLE) to?”

When I hear they do neither, I am dumbfounded.

Everyone has their reasons. Some say that they don’t have the time.

To me, that is like saying you don’t have time to breathe or eat.

You are constantly filling your mind. It is your choice to decide what to fill it with.

If you have 3 minutes to read the news or scroll Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram or ESPN, you also have 3 minutes to read.

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Since more than a quarter of all US Adults didn’t read a book last year, yet watch a few hours of TV per day, those 3 minutes can really make a difference.

If you just read three minutes a day, in a year you would have read for 18 hours. For a slow reading speed of 60 words a minute that is over 3 average sized business books per year! Imagine, 3 books, up from ZERO, on only 3-minutes day.

Could be life changing. You can start today.

Everyone can become a better “reader”. No one is “not good at reading (listening)”, some of us just don’t do it enough.

Reading helps in a variety of ways.

Books can be a source of knowledge. All knowledge is better coming from the source. Find the closest point to the source and soak up that knowledge.

Besides knowledge, there are a few other reasons that reading books can be helpful:

Stress reduction.

Less Stress = Less Anxiety

Reading allows you to step outside of your current problem and look into another world, read the mind of someone else. You can get centered and find balance as you read.

Better vocabulary and writing skills.

The better you express yourself, the more influence you have. Read more so you can do more.

You could live longer.

Yale researchers said so. They studied 3,635 people over the age of 50 and found some incredible correlations. People who read books at least 30 minutes per day lived on average 23 months longer. Now that is awesome. It might not be because of the reading, it might be that people who read are naturally more active, or take better care of their bodies, or have better inter-personal relationships. Or, maybe what they read helped them decide to make better decisions. The actual reason doesn’t really matter, if you read books more, you will probably live a bit longer.

Improved memory.

Not sure if this is proven, I just anecdotally know the people who read the most can remember the most. It is the same with me as well, the more I read, the more I remember.

You could become a bit more open-minded.

Reading helps you see things from different perspectives. By being flexible and adaptable and not always needing closure you can formulate ideas that are traditionally not accepted, thus allowing new opportunities to be born.

Deeper situational awareness.

Your life is made up of intersecting situations. When you read you can see how the storylines, plots, and characters all weave together, and you will be able to notice similar patterns in real life. When you can see the big picture, your actions will always be better.

 

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And if none of these observations or  suggestions* resonate with you, remember the immortal words of P. J. O’Rourke:  “Always read something that will make you look good if you die in the middle of it.”

 

 

Craig J. McConnell
President/COO
SalesGrowPro/PrintGrowPro, Inc.
10902 Big  Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
1 Seaside Lane
#203
Belleair, FL 33756
*in an effort to be transparent, not all of this is my intellectual property, but has been ‘stolen’ over the years  -  would give credit (where credit is due) but I can’t find the original source.

 


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TAKE A MONTH – CHANGE YOUR LIFE

Posted on May 23, 2018 under Life 101.

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 We all  talk about  the need for ‘personal growth’ and ‘lifelong learning’, but few of us have the discipline to truly ‘change.’  Here are 15 “REALLY EASY” difference makers:

1. If a task if going to take you less than a minute to complete, do it as soon as you think of it.

The One-Minute Rule is simple, but it works! Getting out of the habit of putting things off is the easiest way to get shit done.

2. Read for a set amount of time every single day.

Do you get shocked when people say they do not read books?

I do. Usually, I say: “That’s ok, Audible and Blinkest count too.”

Then, they say they don’t do that either. That is when I don’t know what to say.

Everyone has their reasons. Some say that they don’t have the time.

To me, that is like saying you don’t have time to breathe…

You are constantly filling your mind. It is your choice to decide what to fill it with.

If you have 3 minutes to read the news or scroll Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram or ESPN, you also have 3 minutes to read.

Since more than a quarter of all US Adults didn’t read a book last year, yet watch a few hours of TV per day, those 3 minutes can really make a difference.

If you just read three minutes a day, in a year you would have read for 18 hours. For a slow reading speed of 60 words a minute that is over 3 average sized business books per year! Imagine, 3 books, up from ZERO, on only 3-minutes day.

Could be life changing. You can start today.

3. Actually start flossing your teeth at least once a day.

It will be worth it when you don’t have to lie at your next dentist appointment.

4. Try and go to bed at the same time each night, and wake up at a similar time each morning.

Your body loves habits, especially good sleep habits. Set a go-to-bed alarm, as well as a wake-up alarm, and try and stick to both most days.

5. Make your bed each and every morning.

Coming home to a bedroom with a made bed is a pure delight. Once you’re in the habit of making your bed, you won’t be able to believe you ever left the house without doing it.

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6. Add one new healthy food or ingredient into your diet.

Adding something healthy feels way better than taking something out of your diet, so choose a new vegetable, grain, or spice and work it into your meal rotation.

7. Find a workout you can do comfortably in your own home, and do it regularly.

Even if it’s just a short routine of push-ups, sit-ups, lunges, and squats, you’ll always have something to do on days you can’t be bothered getting to the gym or a class.

8. Instead of putting things down, put them away.

Leaving things where they don’t belong is how homes get messy. Avoid an hour of tidying up by taking a few seconds to put things away as you finish with them.

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9. Each night, plan what you’re going to wear the next day.

One less decision you need to make in the AM.

10. Practice a new skill or hobby for 10 minutes every day.

Whether it’s watercolor painting, embroidery, violin, or learning a new language, dedicating10 minutes a day to it guarantees you’ll have improved by the end of the month.

11. Save every $5 bill that makes its way into your wallet.

A lot of people swear by this simple money-saving trick. Stash away every $5 note you come across, and enjoy your savings at a later date.

12. Write down three things you’re grateful for each night before bed.

Keeping a gratitude list or journal is a lovely practice that helps highlight all the good things you have going on in your life’.

13. Try meditating, starting with just three minutes a day.

The first session on the Calm app is just three minutes long. Start there, and see how you feel after a month of daily meditation.

14. Keep track of how much water you’re drinking, and set daily hydration goals.

15. Call someone when you’re having a bad day, whether that person is a friend, family member, or health professional.

Find your person, then get into the habit of calling them to chat more regularly.

I intend to expand on each of these in future postings, but for now, just pick one  -  and I would suggest #2.

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Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

314-753-2802
1 Seaside Lane #203
Belleair, FL 33756
53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143

*KUDOS and thanks to Erin Vasocich @ BUZZFEED for the concept

 

 

 

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Seth Godin: Avoiding The Race To The Bottom

Posted on April 5, 2017 under Life 101.

I have always considered Seth Godin to be one of my mentors/heroes/business consulting role-models. Thought you might appreciate the attached. If you’re real busy, jump ahead to the last two paragraphs. Enjoy and cogitate

“If war has an opposite, it’s not peace, it’s civilization. (inspired by Ursula LeGuin writing in 1969)

“Civilization is the foundation of every successful culture. It permits us to live in safety, without being crippled by fear. It’s the willingness to discuss our differences, not to fight over them. Civilization is efficient, in that it permits every member of society to contribute at her highest level of utility. And it’s at the heart of morality, because civilization is based on fairness.

“The civilization of a human encampment, a city or town where people look out for one another and help when help is needed is worth seeking out.

“We’re thrilled by the violent video of the iguana and the snakes, partly because we can’t imagine living a life like that, one where we are always at risk.

“To be always at risk, to live in a society where violence is likely—this undermines our ability to be the people we seek to become.

“Over the last ten generations, we’ve made huge progress in creating an ever more civilized culture. Slavery (still far too prevalent) is now seen as an abomination. Access to information and healthcare is better than it’s ever been. Human culture is far from fully civilized, but as the years go by, we’re getting better at seeing all the ways we have to improve.

“And this can be our goal. Every day, with every action, to make something more civilized. To find more dignity and possibility and opportunity for those around us, those we know and don’t know.

Hence the imperative. Our associations, organizations and interactions must begin with a standard of civility. Our work as individuals and as leaders becomes worthwhile and generous when we add to our foundation of civilization instead of chipping away at it.

“The standard can come from each of us. We can do it. We can speak up. We can decide to care a little more. We can stand up to the boss, the CEO, or the elected representative and say, “wait,” when they cross the line, when they pursue profit at the cost of community, when they throw out the rules in search of a brawl instead. The race to the bottom and the urge to win at all costs aren’t new, but they’re not part of who we are and ought to be.”

Thought Questions

Make it a great rest of the week  always remember YOU DID NOT WAKE UP TODAY TO BE MEDIOCRE!!!

Craig McConnell, President,

PrintGrowPro/SalesGrowPro

RETIREMENT REIMAGINED  -  ENTERING ADULTHOOD 2.0

www.printgrowpro.com

“Great selling is a process artfully done.” 

Follow me on Twitter – http://twitter.com/printgrowpro 

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What Do You Know Abour ‘Forest Bathing’?

Posted on November 29, 2016 under Life 101, Retirement Reimagined.

FOREST BATHING Is The Latest Fitness Trend To Hit the US

Where yoga was 30 years ago???

By Meeri Kim

May 17

(iStockphoto)

Over thousands of years of human history, we have effectively become an indoor species. Particularly for those of us trapped in the cubicle life, often the only times we regularly step foot outside is for our daily work commute or to run errands. In 2001, a survey sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency found that, on average, Americans spend 87 percent of their time indoors and 6 percent in an enclosed vehicle.

However, a number of scientific studies emphasize that reveling in the great outdoors promotes human health. Spending time in natural environments has been linked to lower stress levels, improved working memory and feeling more alive, among other positive attributes.

In an effort to combat our indoor epidemic and reap these health benefits, a growing number of Americans have become followers of a Japanese practice called Shinrin-yoku. Coined by the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries in 1982, the word literally translates to “taking in the forest atmosphere” or “forest bathing” and refers to the process of soaking up the sights, smells and sounds of a natural setting to promote physiological and psychological health.

The increasing popularity of Shinrin-yoku, particularly in California, echoes the adoption of other east-to-west health trends, such as yoga and meditation. And like these activities, forest therapy can be a guided, paid-for experience or freely performed solo.

“I think about where yoga was 30 years ago and where it is today, and I realize that forest therapy is making the same journey toward cultural definition in a way that will mainstream the practice,” said Ben Page, a certified forest therapy guide who founded Shinrin Yoku Los Angeles. He recently returned to his home in Southern California after training a cohort of forest therapy guides toward certification in Sonoma County — a week-long program popular enough to have a waiting list.

Those that practice Shinrin-yoku explain that it differs from hiking or informative nature excursions because it centers on the therapeutic aspects of forest bathing.

“So whereas a nature walk’s objective is to provide informational content and a hike’s is to reach a destination, a Shinrin-yoku walk’s objective is to give participants an opportunity to slow down, appreciate things that can only be seen or heard when one is moving slowly, and take a break from the stress of their daily lives,” Page said.

For instance, a 2010 study using data from field experiments conducted in 24 forests across Japan found that subjects who participated in forest bathing had lower blood pressure, heart rate and concentrations of salivary cortisol — a stress hormone — when compared with those who walked through a city setting. Studies performed in other countries, such as Finland and the United States showed similar reductions in tension and anxiety.

“There have been studies comparing walking in nature with walking in an urban environment and testing people on their mood, different aspects of depression, and in some cases, brain scans,” said David Yaden, a research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania’s Positive Psychology Center. “In the natural setting, people are more relaxed and less stressed.”

People on nature walks also tend to engage in less rumination, or negative self-referential overthinking, which has been correlated with depression.

Other studies have found an association between Shinrin-yoku and a boost in immune function. Subjects took a 3-day/2-night trip to forest areas in Japan with researchers taking blood and urine samples before and after the excursion. The numbers of natural killer cells — a type of white blood cell that fights infected or tumor cells — and other immune system markers were significantly higher after forest bathing than before. Participants’ natural killer cell activity rose about 50 percent throughout the trip, while their urinary adrenaline concentration showed a decrease.

“In Japan, Shinrin-yoku trails are certified by a blood-sampling study to determine whether the natural killer cell count is raised enough for the trail to qualify,” Page said. “I should also note that in Japan and Korea, forest therapy modalities are integrated into their medical system and are covered by insurance.”

Some researchers attribute Shinrin-yoku’s health benefits to substances called phytoncides, which are antimicrobial organic compounds given off by plants. They argue that by breathing in the volatile substances released by the forest, people achieve relaxation. However, phytoncides — colloquially known in forest bathing circles as “the aroma of the forest” — only exist in small concentrations out in the field as compared with the amounts given to subjects in laboratory-based olfactory studies.

Another possible explanation for forest bathing’s soothing effects involves our sense of awe when viewing natural beauty. Yaden, who recently published a study on the awe experienced by astronauts viewing Earth from space, explains that both perceptual (e.g. admiring a tall grove of trees or the Grand Canyon) and conceptual vastness (e.g. trying to wrap your mind around the Big Bang) can inspire awe in humans.

“We describe in the paper that this particular view of Earth produces both types of vastness — perceptual vastness of this sweeping view of the planet, but conceptual vastness of everything that the planet means to us as human beings,” Yaden said. Taking in the sights, sounds and smells of a forest could potentially arouse similar feelings of awe that have been linked to improvements in certain markers of good health.

While the exact mechanisms of Shinrin-yoku remain largely unknown, the practice itself continues to spread — perhaps as a backlash against modern society’s obsession with indoor-use technology and office culture. Amos Clifford, a wilderness guide based in the San Francisco Bay Area, founded the Association of Nature and Forest Therapy in 2012. For a tuition fee, the organization offers forest therapy guide certification programs. Besides U.S.-based training in Northern California and Massachusetts, others are scheduled for next year in Canada, Ireland, New Zealand and South Africa.

Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

314-753-2802
1170 Tropical Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143

 


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You Will Never Regret Being Kind

Posted on November 28, 2016 under Life 101.

2016-11-03-1478213220-62217-8HabitsofConsideratePeopleHP.jpg

**Philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer once said, “Politeness is to human nature what warmth is to wax.” It’s true. Being kind and considerate softens people and makes them malleable to your way of thinking.

But I see another meaning there, too. I think he’s also saying that being considerate of others is an integral part of what it means to be human. Charles Darwin would have agreed. He argued that our instinct to be considerate is even stronger than our instinct to be self-serving.

As obvious as that may seem, it’s only recently that neuroscience has been able to explain why. Research conducted by Dacher Keltner at Berkeley showed that our brains react exactly the same when we see other people in pain as when we experience pain ourselves. Watching someone else experience pain also activates the structure deep inside the brain that’s responsible for nurturing behavior, called the periaqueductal gray.

Being considerate of others is certainly a good career move, but it’s also good for your health. When you show consideration for others, the brain’s reward center is triggered, which elevates the feel-good chemicals dopamine, oxytocin, and endogenous opioids. This gives you a great feeling, which is similar to what’s known as “runner’s high,” and all that oxytocin is good for your heart.

“Being considerate of others will take you further in life than any college or professional degree.” – Marian Wright Edelman

That’s all well and good, but how practical is it? How do you become more considerate when you have so many other things competing for your finite mental energy? It’s not that hard—all you have to do is emulate the habits of highly considerate people.

1. Show up on time. Sure, sometimes things happen, but always showing up late sends a very clear message that you think your time is more important than everyone else’s, and that’s just rude. Even if you really do think that your time is more important, you don’t have to broadcast that belief to the world. Instead, be considerate and show up when you said you would.

2. Be deliberately empathic. It’s one thing to feel empathy for other people, but putting that feeling into action is another matter entirely. It’s great to be able to put yourself in someone else’s shoes—in fact, it’s essential—but that doesn’t necessarily translate into being considerate. To be deliberately empathic, you have to let your ability to walk in their shoes change what you do, whether that’s changing your behavior to accommodate their feelings or providing tangible help in a tough situation. This requires emotional intelligence.

3. Apologize when you need to (and don’t when you don’t).
We all know people who are so insecure or so afraid of offending someone that they practically apologize for breathing. In such situations, apologizing loses its meaning. But it’s a different matter entirely when a sincere apology is really necessary. When you’ve made a mistake, or even think you’ve made a mistake, apologizing is a crucial part of being considerate.

4. Smile a lot. Physically, it’s easier to frown than to smile—smiling involves 42 different muscles; however, it pays to make the extra effort, as smiling has a huge effect on other people. People naturally (and unconsciously) mirror the body language of the person they’re talking to. When you smile at people, they will unconsciously return the favor and feel good as a result.

5. Mind your manners. A lot of people have come to believe that not only are manners unnecessary, they’re undesirable because they’re fake. These people think that being polite means you’re acting in a way that doesn’t reflect how you actually feel, but they’ve got it backwards. “Minding your manners” is all about focusing on how the other person feels, not on how you feel. It’s consciously acting in a way that puts other people at ease and makes them feel comfortable.

6. Be emotionally intelligent. One of the huge fallacies our culture has embraced is that feeling something is the same as acting on that feeling, and that’s just wrong, because there’s this little thing called self-control. Whether it’s helping out a co-worker when you’re in a crunch to meet your own deadline or continuing to be pleasant with someone who is failing to return the favor, being considerate often means not acting on what you feel.

7. Try to find a way for everybody to win. Many people approach life as a zero-sum game. They think that somebody has to win and somebody else has to lose. Considerate people, on the other hand, try to find a way for everybody to win. That’s not always possible, but it’s their goal. If you want to be more considerate, stop thinking of every interaction with others as a win/lose scenario.

8. Act on your intuition when it comes to other people’s needs.
Sometimes you can just tell when someone is upset or having a bad day. In such cases, being considerate means checking in with them to see if your intuition is correct. If your intuition is telling you to reach out—do it; they’ll appreciate your concern.

Bringing It All Together

Being considerate is good for your mental and physical health, your career, and everyone around you. On top of that, it just feels good.

Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

314-753-2802
1170 Tropical Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
**from the blog of Dr. Travis Bradbury

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Things I’ll Teach My First Kid Or, 14 Reasons Why I Suck

Posted on June 17, 2015 under Life 101.

I really wish I was insightful enough to have written this, but credit needs to go to Evan Porter; please take the time to read – trust me, it’s worth it .

When I found out, I was holding a six-pack of beer.

“I’m pregnant,” she said. Words I knew would be coming one day soon, but not this soon. I always pictured hearing them on a sunny front porch, wind gently rocking a wooden swing back and forth. Or something like that. And there’d be music. Something upbeat and hopeful like what plays before the final credits of a Zach Braff movie.

I never thought I’d hear those words standing in the doorway of our dark, half-packed apartment, weary from a long day. My wife, Sarah, eyes puffy and mascara-soaked from her own shitty day, and then again from crying tears of joy, holding not one, but two pregnancy tests as proof.

My first thought was that we were about to miss our fantasy football draft.

My second thought was to open a beer.

My third thought was, “I can’t believe those were my first two thoughts.”

It takes a moment like that to realize how woefully unprepared you are to be responsible for another human being. How terrifying it all is. And I’m not talking about waking up in the middle of the night to sooth a crying baby. I’m not talking about changing a dirty diaper or saying goodbye to your “raucous” social life (Sarah and I watch, on average, ten thousand hours of TV every night; so, that shipped sailed a while ago).

I’m talking about when your child learns to talk and what you say to him or her actually matters. When you have to start really thinking about how you want to raise them. What you’ll tell them when they get picked on at school. What you’ll say when they take a philosophical stand against the concept of homework.

It makes you question your values. Or wonder if you even have values to question.

And this line of thinking has led me to believe that I am already a terrible father. Because when I think about the things I want to instill in our first child, I realize that I embody exactly none of them.

But here they are, anyway:

I’ll say, listen, kid, not everyone has to like you. Speak your mind when you know you’re right. Tell friends the truth even when they don’t want to hear it. Don’t just nod and “see both sides” and give pity laughs to people who make bad jokes.

I’ll say, work hard in school. Not so you can make money and not for the bragging rights, but because if you don’t, one day you’ll look back and wish you’d made yourself proud.

I’ll say, clean your room. I’ll say, you see this 6-inch pile of dirty clothes next to my bed? It makes me feel horrible every time I look at it. You’d be surprised how accomplished seeing your bedroom floor can make you feel.

I’ll say, always finish what you started. There’s a reason I can only teach you to be “pretty good”, and not great, at guitar, or photography, or card tricks, or any number of things I picked up and abandoned. If you have a talent for something, don’t ever waste it.

I’ll say, don’t wait so long to get comfortable in your own skin. Phases are great and all when you’re a teenager, but there’s a fine line between exploring things and getting caught up in fads. Don’t ever feel like you need to fit into a mold or a category to be accepted.

I’ll say, take care of your body, because you only get one. Floss every day. And don’t drink so much soda and Red Bull. You can’t ever undo the cavities they’ll give you.

I’ll say, force yourself to experience new things. I know that people who studied abroad in college are obnoxious, but I don’t care; you should do it. Because when they’re yammering on about their summer in Madrid, you’ll roll your eyes but you’ll really just be jealous that you spent your summer watching TV.

I’ll say, don’t get so uncomfortable around homeless people. They’re not going to rob you. Be better than that. Treat them with respect. Buy them a sandwich if you can. And give to charity as often as possible. You’ll always have a few bucks to spare.

I’ll say, pay attention to the news. And politics. Don’t spend all your time on social media and TV and movies and sports. Devote your attention to things that actually matter. Be informed and well read. Don’t ever be forced to stealthily object from conversations about current events.

I’ll say, be ruthless. Don’t go with the flow. Find something you want and put in the work to become exceptional. So many people dream big, but they’re afraid to sit down and do the work. Don’t be one of them.

I’ll say, don’t text and drive. Seriously. There’s nothing that can’t wait. I mean it.

I’ll say, put your family first, above everything. When they need you, be there. Don’t ask questions. Don’t let being tired from work become an excuse. They’re all you have.

I’ll say, don’t ever wish you were anything or anyone else. Embrace your flaws, because everyone has them.

And I’ll say, if you fall short of anything, even everything on this list, that’s alright.

I’ll still love you.

I’ll always love you. People keep asking me if I’m scared. And I guess — even in light of everything I said above — the answer is no.

I know that there’ll be times when I have no idea what to do with this kid. When I reach into my bag of morals and values and come up empty. And for times like that, I’ll look to my wife. I’ll remember how, standing in our dark, half-packed apartment, on one of the most important nights of our life, she put the pregnancy tests down on the table, smiled, and said:

“Of course we’re still doing the fantasy draft.”

A small reminder of why we fell in love in the first place. That what we’ve created together didn’t happen in spite of our flaws.

It happened because of them.

And knowing that, there’s really nothing to be scared of.

Craig J McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
 
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable
(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement

314-753-2802
 

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Ever Wonder Why Generation Y Yuppies Are So Unhappy

Posted on September 6, 2014 under Life 101.

 

Craig J. McConnell
President
PrintGrowPro/SalesGrowPro, Inc.
314-753-2802

craigmcconnell49@gmail.com“Making Sales People Memorable”

 
Visit my blog @ www.printgrowpro.com
 
 
Follow me onTwitter:  http://twitter.com/printgrowpro
 
Grow sales via better prospect management:  www.veritastraining.com

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Questions To Ask Yourself Daily

Posted on March 23, 2014 under Life 101.

Check The Link Below And Then Ask Yourself These Questions Daily – Without Fail!!!

And then, based upon your answers  –  TAKE ACTION!

 

http://lnkd.in/dc2MKQm

Craig J. McConnell
President
PrintGrowPro/SalesGrowPro, Inc.
314-753-2802

craigmcconnell49@gmail.com“Making Sales People Memorable”
 
Visit my blog @ www.printgrowpro.com
 
 
Follow me onTwitter:  http://twitter.com/printgrowpro
 
Grow sales via better prospect management:  www.veritastraining.com

 


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Words DO Matter – A Short Video

Posted on January 9, 2014 under Life 101.

In your communication, emails, verbal scripts and dialog — WORDS matter!!!!

As always, thanks for being here and have a super week.

Craig McConnell, President

PrintGrowPro/SalesGrowPro

www.printgrowpro.com


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Prioritizing Your “to do” List

Posted on August 22, 2013 under Life 101.

Focus on your priorities, but take things in stride.  Make decisions, not excuses.  Live one moment at a time.  Count your blessings, not your troubles.  Let the wrong things go.  Look for lessons in unforeseen obstacles.  Ask for help.  Give as much as you take.  Make time for those who matter.  Laugh when you can.  Cry when you need to.  And always stay true to your values.

      marcandangel.com    

Thanks for being here and make it a memorable day.

Craig McConnell, President, PrintGrowPro/SalesGrowPro

www.printgrowpro.com

Follow me on Twitter – http://twitter.com/printgrowpro


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