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What Do You Know Abour ‘Forest Bathing’?

Posted on November 29, 2016 under Life 101, Retirement Reimagined.

FOREST BATHING Is The Latest Fitness Trend To Hit the US

Where yoga was 30 years ago???

By Meeri Kim

May 17

(iStockphoto)

Over thousands of years of human history, we have effectively become an indoor species. Particularly for those of us trapped in the cubicle life, often the only times we regularly step foot outside is for our daily work commute or to run errands. In 2001, a survey sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency found that, on average, Americans spend 87 percent of their time indoors and 6 percent in an enclosed vehicle.

However, a number of scientific studies emphasize that reveling in the great outdoors promotes human health. Spending time in natural environments has been linked to lower stress levels, improved working memory and feeling more alive, among other positive attributes.

In an effort to combat our indoor epidemic and reap these health benefits, a growing number of Americans have become followers of a Japanese practice called Shinrin-yoku. Coined by the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries in 1982, the word literally translates to “taking in the forest atmosphere” or “forest bathing” and refers to the process of soaking up the sights, smells and sounds of a natural setting to promote physiological and psychological health.

The increasing popularity of Shinrin-yoku, particularly in California, echoes the adoption of other east-to-west health trends, such as yoga and meditation. And like these activities, forest therapy can be a guided, paid-for experience or freely performed solo.

“I think about where yoga was 30 years ago and where it is today, and I realize that forest therapy is making the same journey toward cultural definition in a way that will mainstream the practice,” said Ben Page, a certified forest therapy guide who founded Shinrin Yoku Los Angeles. He recently returned to his home in Southern California after training a cohort of forest therapy guides toward certification in Sonoma County — a week-long program popular enough to have a waiting list.

Those that practice Shinrin-yoku explain that it differs from hiking or informative nature excursions because it centers on the therapeutic aspects of forest bathing.

“So whereas a nature walk’s objective is to provide informational content and a hike’s is to reach a destination, a Shinrin-yoku walk’s objective is to give participants an opportunity to slow down, appreciate things that can only be seen or heard when one is moving slowly, and take a break from the stress of their daily lives,” Page said.

For instance, a 2010 study using data from field experiments conducted in 24 forests across Japan found that subjects who participated in forest bathing had lower blood pressure, heart rate and concentrations of salivary cortisol — a stress hormone — when compared with those who walked through a city setting. Studies performed in other countries, such as Finland and the United States showed similar reductions in tension and anxiety.

“There have been studies comparing walking in nature with walking in an urban environment and testing people on their mood, different aspects of depression, and in some cases, brain scans,” said David Yaden, a research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania’s Positive Psychology Center. “In the natural setting, people are more relaxed and less stressed.”

People on nature walks also tend to engage in less rumination, or negative self-referential overthinking, which has been correlated with depression.

Other studies have found an association between Shinrin-yoku and a boost in immune function. Subjects took a 3-day/2-night trip to forest areas in Japan with researchers taking blood and urine samples before and after the excursion. The numbers of natural killer cells — a type of white blood cell that fights infected or tumor cells — and other immune system markers were significantly higher after forest bathing than before. Participants’ natural killer cell activity rose about 50 percent throughout the trip, while their urinary adrenaline concentration showed a decrease.

“In Japan, Shinrin-yoku trails are certified by a blood-sampling study to determine whether the natural killer cell count is raised enough for the trail to qualify,” Page said. “I should also note that in Japan and Korea, forest therapy modalities are integrated into their medical system and are covered by insurance.”

Some researchers attribute Shinrin-yoku’s health benefits to substances called phytoncides, which are antimicrobial organic compounds given off by plants. They argue that by breathing in the volatile substances released by the forest, people achieve relaxation. However, phytoncides — colloquially known in forest bathing circles as “the aroma of the forest” — only exist in small concentrations out in the field as compared with the amounts given to subjects in laboratory-based olfactory studies.

Another possible explanation for forest bathing’s soothing effects involves our sense of awe when viewing natural beauty. Yaden, who recently published a study on the awe experienced by astronauts viewing Earth from space, explains that both perceptual (e.g. admiring a tall grove of trees or the Grand Canyon) and conceptual vastness (e.g. trying to wrap your mind around the Big Bang) can inspire awe in humans.

“We describe in the paper that this particular view of Earth produces both types of vastness — perceptual vastness of this sweeping view of the planet, but conceptual vastness of everything that the planet means to us as human beings,” Yaden said. Taking in the sights, sounds and smells of a forest could potentially arouse similar feelings of awe that have been linked to improvements in certain markers of good health.

While the exact mechanisms of Shinrin-yoku remain largely unknown, the practice itself continues to spread — perhaps as a backlash against modern society’s obsession with indoor-use technology and office culture. Amos Clifford, a wilderness guide based in the San Francisco Bay Area, founded the Association of Nature and Forest Therapy in 2012. For a tuition fee, the organization offers forest therapy guide certification programs. Besides U.S.-based training in Northern California and Massachusetts, others are scheduled for next year in Canada, Ireland, New Zealand and South Africa.

Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

314-753-2802
1170 Tropical Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143

 


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Retirement Reimagined: Sex, Spock, and Climate Change (a TedxVail Talk)

Posted on February 23, 2016 under ADULTHOOD II, Retirement Reimagined.

 Image result for words with pictures about retirementImage result for words with pictures about retirement

Sex, Spock, and Climate Change | Justin Bogardus | TedxVail

What do Spock, sex, and climate change have to do with each other? Naturally intriguing, this humorous talk from the writer/director of the Nature RX viral video asks us, “Does nature have a marketing problem?’
“Well worth watching! Justin’s talk is full of fun and inspiring moments for all of us to enjoy - especially those of us wondering about what’s happening to our planet and what we can do. It’s particularly relatable and poignant for creators, marketers, bloggers, psychologists, activists, and environmentalists, looking to spread their message and connect with audiences.”  

Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

 


314-753-2802
1443 Hagen Avenue
Dunedin, FL 34698

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 


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Retirement Reminagined: The Health Benefits of A Smile (a short TEDTalk video)

Posted on February 9, 2016 under ADULTHOOD II, Retirement Reimagined, Thoughts for the Week.

Ron Gutman reviews a raft of studies about smiling, and reveals some surprising results. Did you know your smile can be a predictor of how long you’ll live — and that a simple smile has a measurable effect on your overall well-being? Prepare to flex a few facial muscles as you learn more about this evolutionarily contagious behavior.

Why you should listen

Ron Gutman is the founder and CEO of HealthTap — free mobile and online apps for immediate access to relevant, reliable and trusted health answers and tips from a network of over 38,000 U.S.-licensed doctors. He’s responsible for the company’s innovation, vision and product. Before this, he foundes and led an online consumer health company that developed the world’s largest community of independent health writers; it was acquired in early 2009.

As a graduate student at Stanford, Gutman organized and led a multidisciplinary group of faculty and graduate students from the schools of Engineering, Medicine, Business, Psychology and Law to conduct research in personalized health and to design ways to help people live healthier, happier lives. He is an angel investor and advisor to health and technology companies such as Rock Health (the first Interactive Health Incubator) and Harvard Medical School’s SMArt Initiative (“Substitutable Medical Apps, reusable technologies”). He’s the organizer of TEDxSiliconValley.

 

Ron Gutman

Entrepreneur
Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

 


314-753-2802
1443 Hagen Avenue
Dunedin, FL 34698

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143

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Retirment Reimagined – Thoughts For The Week

Posted on February 1, 2016 under ADULTHOOD II, Retirement Reimagined, Thoughts for the Week.

Ode To Joy To Start You Week With A

Image result for smiley face

http://player.vimeo.com/video/58611141?autoplay=1

He/She who talks the most, loses.

http://www.marcandangel.com/2014/08/13/10-choices-you-wont-regret-in-10-years/

 

 

Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

 


314-753-2802
1443 Hagen Avenue
Dunedin, FL 34698

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 

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TFTW & A Suggestion For the Week: Try Something New For 30 Days (a very brief TEDTalk)

Posted on January 10, 2016 under ADULTHOOD II, Retirement Reimagined.
Why  Should  You Listen?   Because it is only 3 minutes and 27 seconds long and even if you have the attention span of a goldfish, you can handle 207 seconds
Try Something New For 30 Days

 

Matt Cutts works on search at Google, specializing in search optimization. He’s a friendly and public face for helping webmasters understand how Google’s search actually works, making hundreds of videos that answer questions about SEO. (SearchEngineLand made this handy chart of all of them.) He’s an advocate for cutting down on poor practice such as link spam. He also wrote the first version of SafeSearch, Google’s family filter.

Thoughts For the Week

Inspirational, Motivational Quotes Letting go, Motivational, Inspirational Quotes

 

Thought Questions

Thought Questions

Thought Questions

Thought Questions

Make it a great week, always be memorable, and always try to keep that self talk positive.
 
Remember how you act determines how you feel, not the other way around.
 
Craig J. McConnell

“Re-Imagining Retirement & Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

 

 


314-753-2802
1443 Hagen Avenue
Dunedin, FL 34698

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143

 

 

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Retirement Reimagined – “Why The Best Hire Might Not Have The Perfect Resume” (TEDTalk)

Posted on January 4, 2016 under ADULTHOOD II, Retirement Reimagined.

Good morning and Happy Monday.

I’m hoping that after watching this short video, you’ll never look at the resumes that come across your desk in the same way again.

Given the choice between a job candidate with a perfect resume and one who has fought through difficulty, who would you pick?.

Someone who grew up with adversity, and are empowered with the grit to persist in an ever-changing workplace or someone who ‘was born on third base and thought he or she hit a triple?”****

Regina Hartley

Human Resources Manager, UPS

Why you should listen

Throughout her 25-year UPS career – working in talent acquisition, succession planning, learning and development, employee relations, and communications – Regina Hartley has seen how, given the opportunity, people with passion and purpose will astound you. Today, Hartley is a human resources director for UPS Information Services, and makes human connections with employees immersed in technology.

She holds a BA in political science from SUNY Binghamton and an MA in corporate and organizational communication from Fairleigh Dickinson University. She is a certified Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) from the HRCI.

Enjoy!

Why the best hire might not have the perfect resume

http://www.ted.com/talks/regina_hartley_why_the_best_hire_mi…

*****although in political circles this quote is most often credited to Texas Agricultural Commissioner Jim Hightower (when talking about “Dubya’s” Dad at the 1988 Republican Convention), the Chicago Tribune gives Barry Switzer (successful football coach at the University of Oklahoma and for the Dallas Cowboys) credit for using the line in a presentation he made in 1986 (isn’t Google grand  – and remember: ignorance is no longer bliss!).

Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

1443 Hagen Avenue
Dunedin, FL 34698

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143

 


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Retirement Reimagined – Adulthood II – “The US Needs Paid Family Leave — For The Sake Of Its Future.” (a TEDTalks video)

Posted on December 18, 2015 under ADULTHOOD II, Retirement Reimagined.

 

Image result for quotes with pictures about learningImage result for quotes with pictures about learningImage result for quotes with pictures about learning

As a part of my Retirement Reimagined ‘never stop learning’  regimen, I watch  two TEDTALKS daily.

Here’s what I learned yesterday.

Sad but true: The U.S. is still one of only four nations in the world that fails to guarantee the right to paid maternity leave (Swaziland, Lesotho, Papua New Guinea are the other 3).

Here’s a map of how different countries around the world fund legally required paid maternity benefits. It’s compiled by the United Nation’s International Labor Organization, which has some of the best comparative data on the subject. The pink blotches represent countries where new mothers are on their own and no paid leave is required by law. (Note that Australia is pink because the Aussies added paid parental leave in 2012; the data are from 2011.)

PHOTO: Women carry wood in the town of Kerema, Papua New Guinea, Sept. 5, 2014.

 

 

 

Image result for words with pictures about working mothers

 

“We need women to work, and we need working women to have babies. So why is America one of the only countries in the world that offers no national paid leave to new working mothers?

In this incisive talk, Jessica Shortall makes the impassioned case that the reality of new working motherhood in America is both hidden and horrible: millions of women, every year, are forced back to work within just weeks of giving birth.

Her idea worth spreading: the time has come for us to recognize the economic, physical and psychological costs of our approach to working mothers and their babies, and to secure our economic future by providing paid leave to all working parents.”

Why you should listen?

What do breastfeeding and paid leave for working mothers, sustainable eye care, hunger, green investing, giving shoes and the business case for LGBT equality have in common? 

For Jessica Shortall, they have all been opportunities to change the world: challenges that need sustainable solutions and require a deep understanding of market forces, audiences, and cultures. They all require an intense dive into data, and they all benefit from powerful storytelling.

Shortall has provided strategy consulting to dozens of businesses, social enterprises, non-profit organizations and campaigns in the US, UK and beyond. Her first book, Work. Pump. Repeat: The New Mom’s Guide to Surviving Breastfeeding and Going Back to Work, was inspired by her own experiences of circumnavigating the globe with a breast pump. She interviewed hundreds of working mothers and dozens of HR professionals to create a practical, relatable, judgment-free guide for women who want to try to continue breastfeeding after they’ve returned to work.

Shortall started her adult life as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Uzbekistan, and she haven’t stopped searching for ways to change the world since, across non-profit and for-profit worlds. In the early 2000s, she co-founded and franchised a non-profit organization that is now active in more than 40 communities. In 2006, she received an MBA with honors from the University of Oxford, as a Skoll Scholar in Social Entrepreneurship. She went on to spend three years providing consulting services to social entrepreneurs. From 2009 to 2014, she was the first Director of Giving at TOMS Shoes, hired to build out the now-iconic One for One giving mission and strategy. 

She currently lives in Dallas, TX with her husband Clay and her two children.

The US needs paid family leave — for the sake of its future.

By the way, the video is (all of) 16 minutes long.  Enjoy!

http://www.ted.com/talks/jessica_shortall_how_america_fails_…

10 U.S. Companies With Radically Awesome Parental Leave Policies (Google ‘em):  Goldman Sachs, Johnson and Johnson, Netflix, Microsoft, Adobe, Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, Google, and Bank of America.

Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

314-753-2802
1443 Hagen Avenue
Dunedin, FL 34698

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 

 

 


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Retirement Reimagined – Adulthood II – “Why Blogging Is Important” (to me)

Posted on December 15, 2015 under ADULTHOOD II, Retirement Reimagined.

I had an epiphany of sorts last night:  anyone who stops learning is OLD; whether at 20, 66 (yours truly), or 80; anyone who keeps learning stays young.

So, eight months into my second attempt at retirement (and 60 days after returning from our ULTIMATE ROAD TRIP and just months away from planning our ULTIMATE ROAD TRIP II WEST COAST VERSION), I am more convinced than ever that maintaining my blog is going to be critical to my health and well being  - even if no one ever reads it.

Why?

For me, blogging forces me to look beyond the obvious and hopefully to ask more questions (‘he who talks the most loses’).  It seems the more I blog, the less I take for granted and I think, for me,  this will  translate into improving and exercising my memory ( since my Dad lost his battle with Alzheimer’s a few years back, this can’t a bad thing).

Blogging forces me to keep reading and to keep learning – period, end of story.  If I am not careful, I find myself spending too much time absorbing other people’s content – not a good thing.

Blogging has to make me a better writer and I will never complete my ‘great American business book’ if I don’t become a more accomplished ‘person of letters’. PRACTICE MAKE PERFECT, BUT PERFECT PRACTICE PRODUCES PEAK PERFORMANCE (somebody famous said that, not me)

Blogging forces me to be more organized and disciplined.   When asked at the end of the day ‘what’d I do all day?’ I need to be able to respond with more than:  ‘not sure, but I sure was busy.’

And last, but certainly not least, blogging enables me to stay in touch with family, friends, and colleagues.  The positive responses BJ and I received from my attempt at being a wordsmith during our ULTIMATE ROAD TRIP,  made the trip even more enjoyable. All too often, when the adventures and challenges of life come calling, we get too far, too busy or too distracted and forget the important people in our lives.

So there you have it.  Some days I will  be serious.  Some days I will  try to make you think.  Some days I will try to make you smile.  But fear not, on all days, I will  be brief.

 

Image result for thoughts with pictures about getting oldImage result for thoughts with pictures about getting oldImage result for thoughts with pictures about getting oldImage result for thoughts with pictures about getting old

 

I would love to take credit for the thoughts below, but  It was written by Michelle Combs;

“I’m too old for this shit.”  – Detective Roger Murtaugh 

“There are things I am too old for. Time does change a person and I am finding that it is easier to accept these changes than to fight them.”

These are things for which the ship has sailed:

1. Shutting up – I no longer want to keep my mouth shut when I see an injustice. Or feel one. It’s not that I never spoke out, there were times when I did, but it was usually on behalf of someone else. Not for myself. I’m done with that. I don’t know how much good it will do, but if I get treated like shit, I’m going to shout about it.

2. Worrying how I look to others – Randy and I had breakfast at an upscale cafe this morning, well, upscale compared to Waffle House. We were going grocery shopping afterward. My hair would have looked okay if I hadn’t run out of dry shampoo, Also, it’s possible I was wearing jeans that should have been washed 3 wearings ago. But really…jeans don’t ever get dirty, do they? There were four women sitting at the table next to us and every one of them was wearing an infinity scarf. I had a brief moment of panic. I kind of looked like a pan handler and Randy…well, he definitely looked like a pan handler. What would the infinity women think of me? Then I decided that their opinion of me wouldn’t change how my bacon and avocado omelet tasted. For the record, Waffle House has better coffee.

3. Guilty Pleasures – I no longer have any guilty pleasures. I just have regular pleasures. I don’t feel guilty about liking Lady Gaga. I don’t feel guilty about reading every Stephanie Plum book and I certainly don’t feel guilty about getting obsessive about a TV show and watching it over and over. I have moved on from Supernatural and Doctor Who. I am currently re-binge watching The Walking Dead. Because Daryl.

5. Making excuses for my messy house – You know why my house is messy? Because I don’t feel like cleaning right now. Also, it’s messy because I’m unorganized and a bit of a slob.

6. Accumulating shit I don’t need – Oh my god, I cannot convey how much I am done with this. Nearly everything we have isn’t necessary or entertaining or comforting. We have less than two years before our baby boy graduates and starts college. During that time, it is my goal to relieve ourselves of at least half of everything we own. Maybe more.

7. Spending unnecessary time with people I don’t like – I actually started this one a few years ago. I used to go to lunch a few days a week with a group of coworkers. I don’t like them. They are mean, petty, and we don’t share the same interests. One day, I looked at them while they squabbled over sports or politics or a work project and thought what the f@#k am I doing here? And then I stopped having lunch with them. Life is too short to spend unnecessary time with douche twizzles.

8. Finding the good in every person I know – Sometimes, people are assholes. I’m sure, even with the biggest asshole, if you do enough digging, you’ll find something good about that person. But why would I do that? Why have I done that? I don’t want to waste any more time than I have to on unpleasant people. People make their choices. If they decide to be insufferable twat monsters, then so be it. I no longer feel compelled to find something attractive about people like that. I just want move on from them as quickly and painlessly as possible.

There are 8 things that I am too old for. What are you too old for?”

As always, thanks for being here; have a great rest of the week.

Craig J McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
 
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable
(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement

314-753-2802
 

 


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“Retirement Reimagined” – Our ULTIMATE Road Trip Continues From Hillsborough, NC – Travel Blog #21 (mostly ‘pics’)

Posted on September 8, 2015 under Retirement 101, Retirement Reimagined, Travel To Learn.

In the form of a confession,  As we enter our 9th week on the road, we are feeling our ‘natural charm and charisma’ begin to wane a little, so we  have decided to ‘wind OUR ULTIMATE ROAD TRIP down’ and head on home. 

 The goal is to be back in Dunedin by maybe the 16th or 17th giving us both time to reflect, to write, to talk it through, and try to fully appreciate what this trip of 6500+ miles has meant to us as individuals and as a couple.  Stay tuned.

And, since we head for LA on the 25th to visit Ross and Jenna, a little time at home will not be a bad thing.

PS:  we  are also missing our Grand Kids (and their parents)

Mostly just ‘pics’ tonight; enjoy.

Click to Home   The MacArthur Memorial is a museum and research center dedicated to preserving and presenting the story of the life of General of the Army Douglas MacArthur. The Memorial also pays tribute to the millions of men and women who served with General MacArthur in World War I, World War II, and the Korean War.  Situated in downtown Norfolk, VA the Memorial consists of a museum, archive and research center, education center, theater, welcome center, and a gift shop. A visit to the Memorial will allow you to explore the life of one of America’s greatest and most complex leaders.

Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site

Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site, located in Hyde Park, New York, is one of America’s premier examples of the country palaces built by wealthy industrialists during the Gilded Age.

The site includes 211 acres (85 ha) of the original larger property historically named Hyde Park. Situated on the east bank of the Hudson River, the property includes pleasure grounds with views of the river and the distant Catskill Mountains, formal gardens, natural woodlands, and numerous auxiliary structures. The grounds also include Italian gardens that have been restored by the volunteer Frederick W. Vanderbilt Garden Association. Frederick William Vanderbilt (1856–1938) purchased the property in 1895 for use as a seasonal country residence.

Hyde Park Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site.jpg

Hampton Roads Naval Museum | Norfolk, Virginia

The Hampton Roads Naval Museum is an accredited museum operated by the United States Navy that celebrates the 239 years history of the fleet in the Hampton Roads region of Virginia. We are located on the second floor of Nauticus in beautiful downtown Norfolk, Virginia.

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body – but rather a skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, “WOW, what a ride!!!!” (stolen from our dear friend Jane Williams’ email signature)

We did decide to make one final visit to the local ice cream store prior to heading to Betty Ford/Weight Watchers.

Craig J McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
 
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable
(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement

 

 

 

 

 


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“Retirement Reimagined” – Adulthood II – Our ULTIMATE Road Trip Continues From Lewes, Delaware – Travel Blog #20

Today we head for Norfolk (and maybe Kitty Hawk and maybe Raleigh) as our journey back home continues. 

You won’t find a lot of substance in today’s blog (simply because I haven’t ‘made’ the time to write  -  too busy you know), but I wanted you to know we were still around.

We had lunch Sunday and dinner last night with colleagues from our past  -   more  on those enlightening and delightful visits as our journey winds down; stay tuned.

Upon our return, we will be looking to admit ourselves into some sort of program  that will incorporate the best of Betty Ford and Weigh Watchers – any suggestions?

Martha’s Vineyard Camp Meeting Association

The first camp meeting in what became known as Wesleyan Grove was held in 1835. In subsequent years the congregations grew enormously, and many of the thousands in attendance were housed in large tents known as “society tents.” A congregation from a church on the mainland would maintain its own society tent. Conditions were cramped, with men and women sleeping dormitory-style on opposite sides of a central canvas divider. Society tents were arranged in a semicircle on Trinity Park.

Over time, families began leasing small lots on which to pitch their own individual tents. In the 1860s and 1870s, the family tents were rapidly replaced with permanent wooden cottages. At one time there were about 500 cottages; today there are just over 300.

Today the Campground is a community of summer residents and a smaller number of year-round residents who value the intimacy created by the crowding of cottages on small tent lots. Many of the cottages have been owned by the same families for generations. The residents of the Campground have a keen appreciation for the special traditions of which they are a part.

http://www.mvcma.org/history/

 

Travel As Much As You Can; As Far As You Can; As Long As You Can; Life Was Not Meant To Be Lived In One Place

Miles Traveled So Far:  Dunedin, Big Canoe, Ashville,  Hound Ears, Peak of the Otter, Elmira, Corning, Gettysburg, Grottoes, Rutland,  Niagara On The Lake, Franconia Notch, Chautauqua, Camden, Bar Harbor, Wells, Ogunquit, Falmouth, Provincetown, Martha’s Vineyard, Chatham, Hyde Park, NYC, Ocean City, Stone Harbor, Lewes, DE.:  5211

States Visited:  17

Provinces Visited:  1

Days On the Road:  63

Blog Posts:  20

Interesting Blog Posts:  tbd, but today will probably not make the top 10

Status of Marriage:  http://youtu.be/SbH_sDyWZqo

Rainy Days: Counting Today – 4

Beard Status:  Still Gone

Staying True To Our Mission:

Craig J McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
 
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable
(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement

314-753-2802

 

 


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