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Thoughts For the Week(end)

Posted on May 26, 2016 under Thoughts for the Week.

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And finally, a couple of questions for you to consider as we head into the long weekend.

Thought Questions

Thought Questions

Thought Questions

Thought Questions

Make it a great rest of the week  always remember to  be memorable.
 
Remember though, the only person that can make you feel happy is you.  Don’t give others the power to bring you down!

Craig McConnell, President, PrintGrowPro/SalesGrowPro

www.printgrowpro.com

“Great selling is a process artfully done.”

Follow me on Twitter – http://twitter.com/printgrowpro

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Sales 101: What Skills Did You Learn In College?

Posted on April 3, 2016 under Sales 101, Thoughts for the Week.

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“There are now millions of college seniors going about their job search in earnest.

And many of them are using the skills they’ve been rewarded for in the past:

Writing applications

Being judged on visible metrics

Showing up at the official (placement) office

Doing well on the assignments

Paying attention to deadlines, but waiting until the last minute, why not

Getting picked

Fitting in

The thing is, whether you’re a newly graduating senior (in hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt) or a middle-aged, experienced knowledge worker looking for a new job, what the best gigs want to know is:

Can you show me a history of generous, talented, extraordinary side projects?

Have you ever been so passionate about your work that you’ve gone in through the side door?

Are you an expert at something that actually generates value?

Have you connected with leaders in the field in moments when you weren’t actually looking for a job?

Does your reputation speak for itself?

Where online can I see the trail of magic you regularly create?

None of these things are particularly difficult to learn, if you are willing to be not very good at them before you’re good at them.

Alas, famous colleges and the industrial-education process rarely bother to encourage this.

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Craig J. McConnell

“Retirement Reimagined”
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to enter) Adulthood II
 

 


314-753-2802
1170 Tropical Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 

 


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TFTW: Training 101 – “We Are What We Repeatedly Do”

Posted on February 29, 2016 under Thoughts for the Week.

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“Training your employees can pay big dividends.

Sometimes, it’s easy to underestimate just how much it pays.

Consider an employee who is going to work 2000 hours for you this year. It’s not unusual for an organization to spend only 10 or 20 hours training this person–which means about 1% of their annual workload.

How much training would it take for this person to be 10% better at her job? If you invest 100 hours (!) it’ll pay for itself in just six months. There aren’t many investments an organization can make that double in value in a year.

But let’s take it one step further:

Imagine a customer service rep. Fully costed out, it might cost $5 for this person to service a single customer by phone. An untrained rep doesn’t understand the product, or how to engage, or hasn’t been brought up to speed on your systems. As a result, the value delivered in the call is precisely zero (in fact it’s negative, because you’ve disappointed your customer).

On the other hand, the trained rep easily delivers $30 of brand value to the customer, at a cost, as stated, of $5. So, instead of zero value, there’s a profit to the brand of $25. A comparative ROI of infinity.

And of course, the untrained person doesn’t fall into this trap once. Instead, it happens over and over, many times a day.

The short-sighted organization decides it’s ‘saving money’ by cutting back training. After all, the short-term thinking goes, what’s the point of training people if they’re only going to leave. (I’d point out the converse of this–what’s the danger of not training the people who stay?)

It’s tempting to nod in agreement at these obvious cases (or the similar case of getting, or not getting, a great new job based on how skilled you’ve trained yourself to be–again, a huge cliff and difference in return). What’s not so easy is to take responsibility for our own training.

We’ve long passed the point where society and our organization are taking responsibility for what we know and how we approach problems. We need to own it for ourselves.”*

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Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

 


314-753-2802
1443 Hagen Avenue
Dunedin, FL 34698

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 
*INC. MAGAZINE

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Retirement Reminagined: The Health Benefits of A Smile (a short TEDTalk video)

Posted on February 9, 2016 under ADULTHOOD II, Retirement Reimagined, Thoughts for the Week.

Ron Gutman reviews a raft of studies about smiling, and reveals some surprising results. Did you know your smile can be a predictor of how long you’ll live — and that a simple smile has a measurable effect on your overall well-being? Prepare to flex a few facial muscles as you learn more about this evolutionarily contagious behavior.

Why you should listen

Ron Gutman is the founder and CEO of HealthTap — free mobile and online apps for immediate access to relevant, reliable and trusted health answers and tips from a network of over 38,000 U.S.-licensed doctors. He’s responsible for the company’s innovation, vision and product. Before this, he foundes and led an online consumer health company that developed the world’s largest community of independent health writers; it was acquired in early 2009.

As a graduate student at Stanford, Gutman organized and led a multidisciplinary group of faculty and graduate students from the schools of Engineering, Medicine, Business, Psychology and Law to conduct research in personalized health and to design ways to help people live healthier, happier lives. He is an angel investor and advisor to health and technology companies such as Rock Health (the first Interactive Health Incubator) and Harvard Medical School’s SMArt Initiative (“Substitutable Medical Apps, reusable technologies”). He’s the organizer of TEDxSiliconValley.

 

Ron Gutman

Entrepreneur
Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

 


314-753-2802
1443 Hagen Avenue
Dunedin, FL 34698

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143

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Retirment Reimagined – Thoughts For The Week

Posted on February 1, 2016 under ADULTHOOD II, Retirement Reimagined, Thoughts for the Week.

Ode To Joy To Start You Week With A

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http://player.vimeo.com/video/58611141?autoplay=1

He/She who talks the most, loses.

http://www.marcandangel.com/2014/08/13/10-choices-you-wont-regret-in-10-years/

 

 

Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

 


314-753-2802
1443 Hagen Avenue
Dunedin, FL 34698

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 

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Thoughts For The Week & On ‘Lifelong Learning’

Posted on December 22, 2015 under Retirement Reimagined, Thoughts for the Week.

LIFELONG LEARNING

*An explicit focus on ‘lifelong learning” for everyone is perhaps the most significant advantage any organization can create.

*Make it a part of your mission statement   -   it should be spoken of in the same breath with profitability, customer service,  and great quality. 

*Financial support to the initiative is critical.

*REDUX:  it has to apply to the entire organization!

*Non-work related learning experiences are a must as a part of the ‘lifelong learning’ package.

*Involve the employees’ families in the process

*HIRING:  ‘lifelong learning’ opportunities, accomplishments, and goals need to become a part of the hiring and evaluation process.

Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

 


314-753-2802
1443 Hagen Avenue
Dunedin, FL 34698

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 

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“First Impression” Reminder and Thoughts For The Week

Posted on December 7, 2015 under Sales 101, Thoughts for the Week.

Sales 101: We ALL Need To Work Harder At Making A GREAT First Impression

Scientist say we have the attention of a goldfish –  7 seconds. 

Which translates to: you better be ready to amp up your attitude when you meet someone. 

*square the shoulders

*stand up straight(er)  -  make yourself  ’BIG’

*smile, make and maintain eye contact, and generate energy

Follow the example of a master of the first impression  – Disney.  They pay as much attention to their parking lots and parking lot attendants as they do to their rides.  These folks are hand selected and selectively trained to be ‘parking lot professionals.’

 

 

 

  

 

Craig J McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
 
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable
(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement

314-753-2802
 
 
 
Grow sales via better prospect management:  www.veritastraining.com

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TFTW and Some Observations on EMPATHY & WORK

Posted on November 23, 2015 under Thoughts for the Week.

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Empathy is defined by Wikipedia as: “the capacity to recognize or understand another’s state of mind or emotion. It is often characterized as the ability to “put oneself into another’s shoes” or in some way experience the outlook or emotions of another being within oneself.  Empathy does not necessarily imply compassion, or empathic concern because this capacity can be present in context of compassionate or cruel behavior.”

Empathy Drives Sales

Brian Tracy says that if you’re “telling, you’re not selling.’  Great sales people ask great questions and are able to really find out what is really important to their prospects and clients.  The great thing about an emotional competency like empathy is that it can be developed and enhanced.  It just takes practice and has to become a habit.

The really great sales men and women listen, understand what the customer wants, and either give it to her or send her somewhere else where they think they can get it.  That’s empathy; understanding the customer’s needs.  It’s not rocket science, but not everyone can ‘put themselves in the other guys shoes’ every day.

 

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OBSERVATIONS FROM JILLIEN GORDON ON WORK vs. WORKAHOLISM

Over the past year, I’ve been reading, researching, and conducting experiments on myself to understand the difference between high performers and workaholics. I believe that there are healthier ways for us to work without sacrificing our values, the people we value, or the value we create but we, as a society, we mistake workaholism for high performance, but they are two distinct ways of working. In fact, workaholism is the only addiction we celebrate.

High performance and workaholism look the same on the outside. They both look like hard work. The BIG DIFFERENCE is how the individual feels on the inside about who they are in relationships to their work.

A high performer works hard in healthy sustainable ways and feels happy and inspired.

A workaholic works hard in unhealthy unsustainable ways and feels unhappy and burned out.

1. Doing Business vs. Being Busy

A high performer’s #1 goal is to do business. The only thing that matters to them are results. If they can’t see a way to create value in the moment, they facilitate or strategize instead. They know that like the economy, business comes in waves, therefore, they get ready during the dips so they can capitalize during the upswings.

A workaholic’s #1 goal is to be busy. Workaholics fill any space in time with busy work because they feel insecure doing nothing. The insecurity comes from not knowing their value. They believe that the busier they are, the more important they must be. As a result, they find a way to be busy even when it’s not busy season instead of periodically hibernating throughout the days, weeks, months, quarters, and year for when the highs come.

2. Knows What’s Enough vs. Never Enough

A high performer knows what is enough. Whether we win by 1 point or 50 points, it doesn’t matter. A win is a win. High performers seek more in the areas that matters, but they know what enough is in the areas that don’t matter so much. This comes from having a clear definition of success.

A workaholic doesn’t know what enough is. I’m not good enough. This isn’t good enough. I don’t have enough time. I don’t have enough support. They are always focused on more and seeking to maximize everything because they don’t really know what success means to them.

3. 100% At The Right Time vs. 110% All Of The Time

A high performer knows when to turn it up. When their number is called, they give everything they have. They don’t buy into the illusion of 110%. They know that 110% is unsustainable. Instead, they focus on increasing their capacity so that their 100% is better than the competition’s 110%.

A workaholic thinks “turn down for what?” They hustle, grind, and go H.A.M. all of the time. They have difficulty prioritizing what’s important, therefore, everything is important in their mind.

4. Knows Their Value vs. Allows Others To Determine Value

A high performer knows their self-worth and can thus work with a sense a freedom. This comes from doing periodic self-evaluation of their performance so that they can constantly improve. They create their own feedback loops rather than waiting on feedback from others.

A workaholic relies on external validation from their boss, colleagues, and clients and thus works with a sense of fear. They wait for external evaluations such as mid-year or annual reviews done by others to understand how well they are doing.

5. Proactive/Intentional vs. Reactive/Unintentional

A high performer is proactive about their time and work. They design their day and anchor the most meaningful and important things in time first, and then they allow fires and other unplanned events to fill in the rest of their day. They don’t allow distractions to deter their strategy.

A workaholic is reactive about their time and work. They allow other people to choose how their time gets spent working by reacting to emails, fires, unplanned events, and other distractions that arise throughout the day. If and when all of the minutia get addressed, they try to do what’s most meaningful.

6. Focus On What I Control vs. What I Can’t

A high performer focuses on their effort—inputs and outputs. Only the individual knows if they gave the task at hand their best. They judge themselves against their best self as opposed to others.

A workaholic focuses on the outcome and their income. Even when we think we do our best, the outcome that occurs and the income that is derived from it is not fully in our control. Their desire to compare leads them to judge themselves using common metrics of success which aren’t always directly correlated to effort.

7. Put Self First vs. Second

A high performer puts themselves first because they know that by doing so, it allows them to serve others at a higher level. At times it appears to be selfish, but it’s actually selfless because they want to give first-class service to those they work with and for.

A workaholic puts others before themselves. This appears to be selfless, but it’s not sustainable. When we constantly give more than we have and never take time to replenish our source, we end up depleted. This behavior is also driven by the good intention of service, but the desire to be needed and be the hero counters that intention.

At the end of the day, workaholics do work to look important while high performers look for important work to do.

 

Craig J McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
 

 

(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable
(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement

314-753-2802

 


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Thought For The Week: AWESOME (TedTalk Video)

Posted on November 16, 2015 under Sales 101, Thoughts for the Week.

 

Neil Pasricha’s blog 1000 Awesome Things savors life’s simple pleasures, from free refills to clean sheets. In this heartfelt talk, he reveals the 3 secrets (all starting with A) to leading a life that’s truly awesome. (Filmed at TEDxToronto.)

Check out this amazing TED Talk:

Neil Pasricha: The 3 A’s of awesome

 

Craig J. McConnell
President
PrintGrowPro/SalesGrowPro, Inc.
314-753-2802
craigmcconnell49@gmail.com
“Making Sales People Memorable”
 
Visit my blog @ www.printgrowpro.com
 
 
Follow me onTwitter:  http://twitter.com/printgrowpro
 
Grow sales via better prospect management:  www.veritastraining.com

 


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Thoughts For The Week – SEE IT; BELIEVE IT; ACT ON IT (a TEDTALK video)

Posted on November 10, 2015 under Thoughts for the Week.
Draw Your Future – Patti Dobrowolski TED

Craig J McConnell

“Retirement Reimagined”        “Entering Adulthood II”
 
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable
(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement

 

 

  
 

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