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Sales 101: A Clear Rejection Is Always Better Than A Fake Promise

Posted on May 9, 2016 under Sales 101.

Thought For The Day

For 30 days, say hello to everyone you see  -  and I mean everyone. Don’t walk by anyone without acknowledging them. Smile!  Make Eye Contact!  Say ‘Good Morning’. or ‘Good afternoon’ or just ‘HI”.  This is a simple but effective  self talk exercise that generates  positive energy and builds confidence for you, and will do the same for the recipient of your initiative.

David Sandler may have actually coined the expression ‘go for the no’ (or at least his intellectual property seems to imply that), but regardless, it is GREAT advice. I think his quote was something like “you don’t learn how to sell by getting a ‘yes’; you learn how to sell when you get a ‘no’.

Remember, “I’ll think about it” and ‘maybe’ do you no good at all.  Falling into the ‘think it over’ trap is only a time waster.  Timing is important, empathy is critical, but over time you will learn when it is time to give your prospects permission to say ‘no’.

LEARNING FROM REJECTION

When someone doesn’t say yes, they’ll often give you a reason.

A common trap: Believe the reason.

If you start rebuilding your product, your pitch and your PR based on the stated reason, you’re driving by looking in the rear view mirror.

The people who turn you down have a reason, but they’re almost certainly not telling you why.

Fake reasons: I don’t like the color, it’s too expensive, you don’t have enough references, there was a typo in your resume.

Real reasons: My boss won’t let me, I don’t trust you, I’m afraid of change.

By all means, make your stuff better. More important, focus on the unstated reasons that drive most rejections.

And most important: Shun the non-believers and sell to people who want to go on a journey with you.

 

 

Craig J. McConnell

“Retirement Reimagined”
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to enter) Adulthood II
 

 


314-753-2802
1170 Tropical Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458

 


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Sales 101: Green Eggs and Ham ‘aka’ The Value Of Persistence

Posted on April 25, 2016 under Sales 101.

 

Here’s A Thought For The Day

Failure is the path of least persistence.

All great sales people are professionally pleasantly positively persistent (4Ps).  How about you?  Give up easily?  Did you ever stop to count how many times ‘Sam I Am’ asks for the order (before he gets it)?   That is a real study in persistence – especially when you are selling green eggs and ham. 

 

From Seth Godin:

The tidal wave is overrated

Yes, it can lead to wholesale destruction, but it’s the incessant (but much smaller) daily tidal force that moves all boats, worldwide.

And far more powerful than either is the incredible impact of seepage, of moisture, of the liquid that makes things grow.

Facebook and other legendary companies didn’t get that way all at once, and neither will you.

We can definitely spend time worrying about/building the tsunami, but it’s the drip, drip, drip that will change everything in the long run.

A final thought:

If you are persistent you will get it = if you are consistent you will keep it.

Craig J. McConnell

“Retirement Reimagined”
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to enter) Adulthood II
 

 


314-753-2802
1170 Tropical Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 

 


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Sales 101: The Art of The Apology

Posted on April 14, 2016 under Sales 101.

Here Are The 6 Steps To The Perfect Apology, According To Science*

*WordPress and I are struggling tonight; this is a little tough to read and I apologize; worth the effort – promise!

April 13, 2016 | by Robin Andrews
A team of researchers has decided to delve into the human psyche in order to solve an age-old, mystifying problem: what’s the best way to make an apology?
According to their study, published in the journal Negotiation and Conflict Management Research, the perfect apology contains six elements, but acknowledging and accepting responsibility for at least part of the perceived wrongdoing is by far the most important.
The second most important factor was an offer of reparations. “One concern about apologies is that talk is cheap,” Roy Lewicki from The Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business, and lead author of the study, said in a statement.
“But by saying, ‘I’ll fix what is wrong,’ you’re committing to take action to undo the damage.”
Lewicki and his team recruited 333 adults from a range of backgrounds, each of whom was asked to read through a scenario in which they were the manager of an accounting department that was looking to hire a new employee.
At the previous job for one particular hypothetical candidate, they filed an incorrect tax return, but apologized when they were confronted with it.
Each apology varied, and contained one, three, or all six components of what the researchers thought commonly exist in apologies: 1. Expression of regret 2. Explanation of what went wrong 3. Acknowledgment of responsibility 4. Declaration of repentance 5. Offer of repair 6. Request for forgiveness
After being informed which components each apology contained, the participants were then asked to rate, on a numerical scale, how effective, credible, and suitable each apology was.
This study revealed that, in general, the more components that were included, the more effective the apology was.
In a second study, the researchers asked 422 undergraduate students to read through the same scenario included in the first. This time, however, instead of being told which components each apology contained, they were left in the dark. In addition, each apology could contain anywhere from one to six of the components.
Once again, the apologies with the most components were seen to be more effective. Significantly, however, both studies agreed that asking for forgiveness was seen as the least important aspect, whereas accepting responsibility was seen as the most important.
Intriguingly, in both studies, half of the participants were told the tax return error was made accidentally, whereas the other half were told it was knowingly filed incorrectly. Regardless of which they were told, the value of each apologetic component remained the same.
Ultimately, though, the participant who had acted deceivingly was less likely to be hired than the one that was merely incompetent.
It’s important to note that this study only involved reading apologetic statements, so the body language and emotion inherent in verbal apologies – which is at least as important as the content of the apology itself – was unable to be taken into account.
For this, we’re sure the authors can only apologize.
Have a great rest of the week and make sure you stay MEMORABLE!!!
Craig J. McConnell
“Retirement Reimagined”
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to enter) Adulthood II
 
314-753-2802
1170 Tropical Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458
53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 

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Sales 101: What Skills Did You Learn In College?

Posted on April 3, 2016 under Sales 101, Thoughts for the Week.

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“There are now millions of college seniors going about their job search in earnest.

And many of them are using the skills they’ve been rewarded for in the past:

Writing applications

Being judged on visible metrics

Showing up at the official (placement) office

Doing well on the assignments

Paying attention to deadlines, but waiting until the last minute, why not

Getting picked

Fitting in

The thing is, whether you’re a newly graduating senior (in hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt) or a middle-aged, experienced knowledge worker looking for a new job, what the best gigs want to know is:

Can you show me a history of generous, talented, extraordinary side projects?

Have you ever been so passionate about your work that you’ve gone in through the side door?

Are you an expert at something that actually generates value?

Have you connected with leaders in the field in moments when you weren’t actually looking for a job?

Does your reputation speak for itself?

Where online can I see the trail of magic you regularly create?

None of these things are particularly difficult to learn, if you are willing to be not very good at them before you’re good at them.

Alas, famous colleges and the industrial-education process rarely bother to encourage this.

Image result for words with pictures about educationImage result for words with pictures about educationImage result for words with pictures about education

 

Craig J. McConnell

“Retirement Reimagined”
(Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to enter) Adulthood II
 

 


314-753-2802
1170 Tropical Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 

 


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Thoughts For The Week & Sales 101: What Are You Competing On?

Posted on March 22, 2016 under Sales 101.

Image result for words with pictures about being memorableImage result for words with pictures about being memorableImage result for words with pictures about being memorableImage result for words with pictures about being memorableImage result for words with pictures about being memorableImage result for words with pictures about being memorable

What are you competing on?

 

It’s pretty easy to figure out what you’re competing for—attention, a new gig, a promotion, a sale…

But what is your edge? In a hypercompetitive world, whatever you’re competing on is going to become your focus.

If you’re competing on price, you’ll spend most of your time counting pennies.

If you’re competing on noise, you’ll spend most of your time yelling, posting, updating, publishing and announcing.

If you’re competing on trust, you’ll spend most of your time keeping the promises that make you trustworthy.

If you’re competing on smarts, you’ll spend most of your time getting smarter.

If you’re competing on who you know, you’ll spend most of the time networking.

If you’re competing by having true fans, you’ll spend most of your time earning the trust and attention of those that care about your work.

If you’re competing on credentials, you’ll spend most of your time getting more accredited and certified.

If you’re competing on perfect, you’ll need to spend your time on picking nits.

If you’re competing by hustling, you’ll spend most of your time looking for shortcuts and cutting corners.

If you’re competing on getting picked, you’ll spend most of your day auditioning.

If you’re competing on being innovative, you’ll spend your time being curious and shipping things that might not work.

And if you’re competing on always-on responsiveness, you’ll spend your time glued to your work, responding just a second faster than the other guy.

In any competitive market, be prepared to invest your heart and soul and focus on the thing you compete on. Might as well choose something you can live with, a practice that allows you to thrive.

 Make it a memorable week! Be Kind!

Craig J. McConnell


(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

Visit me @ www.printgrowpro.com


314-753-2802
1170 Tropical Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 


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INTUITION: You Heart Knows Things Your Mind Can’t Explain

Posted on March 5, 2016 under Sales 101.

The Powers and Perils of Intuition

Instinct has the power to hush reason. But when is it safe to go with your gut? Researchers may remain uncertain about the reliability of intuition, but it is a difficult force to deny

Intuition

That’s what people call successful decision making that happens without a narrative.

Intuition isn’t guessing. It’s sophisticated pattern matching, honed over time.

Don’t dismiss intuition merely because it’s difficult to understand. You can get better at it by practicing.

Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

 


314-753-2802
1443 Hagen Avenue
Dunedin, FL 34698

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 


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TFTW: Training 101 – “We Are What We Repeatedly Do”

Posted on February 29, 2016 under Thoughts for the Week.

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“Training your employees can pay big dividends.

Sometimes, it’s easy to underestimate just how much it pays.

Consider an employee who is going to work 2000 hours for you this year. It’s not unusual for an organization to spend only 10 or 20 hours training this person–which means about 1% of their annual workload.

How much training would it take for this person to be 10% better at her job? If you invest 100 hours (!) it’ll pay for itself in just six months. There aren’t many investments an organization can make that double in value in a year.

But let’s take it one step further:

Imagine a customer service rep. Fully costed out, it might cost $5 for this person to service a single customer by phone. An untrained rep doesn’t understand the product, or how to engage, or hasn’t been brought up to speed on your systems. As a result, the value delivered in the call is precisely zero (in fact it’s negative, because you’ve disappointed your customer).

On the other hand, the trained rep easily delivers $30 of brand value to the customer, at a cost, as stated, of $5. So, instead of zero value, there’s a profit to the brand of $25. A comparative ROI of infinity.

And of course, the untrained person doesn’t fall into this trap once. Instead, it happens over and over, many times a day.

The short-sighted organization decides it’s ‘saving money’ by cutting back training. After all, the short-term thinking goes, what’s the point of training people if they’re only going to leave. (I’d point out the converse of this–what’s the danger of not training the people who stay?)

It’s tempting to nod in agreement at these obvious cases (or the similar case of getting, or not getting, a great new job based on how skilled you’ve trained yourself to be–again, a huge cliff and difference in return). What’s not so easy is to take responsibility for our own training.

We’ve long passed the point where society and our organization are taking responsibility for what we know and how we approach problems. We need to own it for ourselves.”*

Image result for words with pictures about trainingImage result for quotes with pictures about fitness motivationalImage result for quotes with pictures about fitness motivationalImage result for quotes with pictures about fitness motivational

 

 

Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

 


314-753-2802
1443 Hagen Avenue
Dunedin, FL 34698

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 
*INC. MAGAZINE

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Retirement Reimagined: Sex, Spock, and Climate Change (a TedxVail Talk)

Posted on February 23, 2016 under ADULTHOOD II, Retirement Reimagined.

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Sex, Spock, and Climate Change | Justin Bogardus | TedxVail

What do Spock, sex, and climate change have to do with each other? Naturally intriguing, this humorous talk from the writer/director of the Nature RX viral video asks us, “Does nature have a marketing problem?’
“Well worth watching! Justin’s talk is full of fun and inspiring moments for all of us to enjoy - especially those of us wondering about what’s happening to our planet and what we can do. It’s particularly relatable and poignant for creators, marketers, bloggers, psychologists, activists, and environmentalists, looking to spread their message and connect with audiences.”  

Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

 


314-753-2802
1443 Hagen Avenue
Dunedin, FL 34698

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 


Comments (0)
Sales 101: Want to get more responses for your emails? Write like a third-grader……

Posted on February 19, 2016 under Sales 101.

Having trouble getting replies to your emails? ??

Apparently, one of the best ways to get a reply is to write as if you’re 9 years old.

That’s according to the makers of the Boomerang mail plug-in, who found that writing at a third-grade reading level seems to be the right level of complexity for the average message, after mining their user data for information on what kind of writing actually gets replies.

Click on the link below to learn more.

https://lnkd.in/eEGhCcs

Want to get more responses for your emails? Write like a third-grader.
Have a spectacular weekend  -  Enjoy!
Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

 


314-753-2802
1443 Hagen Avenue
Dunedin, FL 34698

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143
 


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Retirement Reminagined: The Health Benefits of A Smile (a short TEDTalk video)

Posted on February 9, 2016 under ADULTHOOD II, Retirement Reimagined, Thoughts for the Week.

Ron Gutman reviews a raft of studies about smiling, and reveals some surprising results. Did you know your smile can be a predictor of how long you’ll live — and that a simple smile has a measurable effect on your overall well-being? Prepare to flex a few facial muscles as you learn more about this evolutionarily contagious behavior.

Why you should listen

Ron Gutman is the founder and CEO of HealthTap — free mobile and online apps for immediate access to relevant, reliable and trusted health answers and tips from a network of over 38,000 U.S.-licensed doctors. He’s responsible for the company’s innovation, vision and product. Before this, he foundes and led an online consumer health company that developed the world’s largest community of independent health writers; it was acquired in early 2009.

As a graduate student at Stanford, Gutman organized and led a multidisciplinary group of faculty and graduate students from the schools of Engineering, Medicine, Business, Psychology and Law to conduct research in personalized health and to design ways to help people live healthier, happier lives. He is an angel investor and advisor to health and technology companies such as Rock Health (the first Interactive Health Incubator) and Harvard Medical School’s SMArt Initiative (“Substitutable Medical Apps, reusable technologies”). He’s the organizer of TEDxSiliconValley.

 

Ron Gutman

Entrepreneur
Craig J. McConnell

“Entering Adulthood II”
Continuing to) Make Sales People Memorable

(striving to) Re-imagine Retirement
 

 


314-753-2802
1443 Hagen Avenue
Dunedin, FL 34698

53 Chula
10902 Big Canoe
Jasper, GA 30143

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